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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture

The Heart of the City

 
 
Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 5, 2013
1. Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker
Inscription. Mount Vernon Place celebrates Baltimore’s rich cultural heritage, offering an extraordinary array of historic architecture, monuments, sculpture and cultural Institutions. The Washington Monument set the stage for this area in 1829, becoming the first public monument to Washington in the United States. Designed by Robert Mills ((1781-1855), it memorializes Washington resigning his commission as commander of the Continental Army. Built in 1815 and 1829, the 178-foot monument has become an icon of Baltimore.

The opening of the Peabody Institute in 1866 defined Mount Vernon as Baltimore’s cultural center. The Institute originally consisted of a music academy, a library, and art gallery, and a lecture hall—all open to the public. The music academy, the first music school of its kind in the US, has been internationally renowned since the late 19th century. Since 1977, the George Peabody Library and the Peabody Institute have operated as academic divisions of the Johns Hopkins University.

The Walters Art Museum traces its roots to 1874 when William Walters (1819-1894) began opening his house to the public to share his art. By 1902, Walter’s son, Henry (1848-1931), was acquiring art at an unprecedented scale—whole art collections were purchased.

To exhibit his collection, Henry Walters built the Walters Art Gallery

Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 5, 2013
2. Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker
The Washington Monument
in 1905-09. The Walters Art Gallery expanded in 1974, and in 2000 it was renamed the Walters Art Museum.

Mount Vernon attracted other cultural institutions. The Maryland Historical Society relocated in 1919 from Saratoga and St. Paul streets to the former Enoch Pratt house at the corner of Park Avenue and West Monument Street. In the 1970s CENTERSTAGE, a non-profit professional theater, moved into the former Loyola College and High School building. The Contemporary Museum, Baltimore’s premier contemporary art institution, renovated part of the old Home Mutual Life building at Centre and Park streets into exhibit space in 1999.
 
Location. 39° 17.868′ N, 76° 36.918′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of North Charles Street and Mt. Vernon Place on North Charles Street. Click for map. The marker is near the Washington Monument. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Francis Scott Key (here, next to this marker); Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church (here, next to this marker); A Monumental Mistake (a few steps from this marker); Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Contributing to Society

Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, January 5, 2013
3. Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture Marker
Peabody Institute
(within shouting distance of this marker); Roger B. Taney Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Romance of a Romantic (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Honor (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 341 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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