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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson's Command

Starke's Brigade, Jackson's Division

 
 
Starke's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Starke's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Jackson's Command,
Starke's Brigade, Jackson's Division

Brig. Gen. William E. Starke, Commanding.
Organization.
1st, 2nd, 9th, 10th, and 15th Louisiana Infantry,
Coppen's (Louisiana) Battalion.
(September 16-17, 1862.)

On the evening of September 16th, Starke's Brigade formed line perpendicular to this road, on the left of Taliaferro's. When the brigades of Jones and Winder were forced back, on the morning of the 17th, this brigade advanced with Taliaferro's and the rallied brigades, but was driven back. Supported by Early's Brigade it again advanced, but was obliged to retired and reformed, with its division, beyond the West Woods, where it supported the assault of McLaw's Division and Sedgwick's Division of Sumner's Corps. During the engagement General Starke was killed and the command devolved upon Colonel L.A. Stafford of the 9th Louisiana.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 375.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.679′ N, 77° 44.85′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Dunker Church Road
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Jackson's Command Marker
/ Old Hagerstown Pike, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); Brigadier General William E. Starke (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Philadelphia Brigade Park (about 500 feet away); Philadelphia Brigade Monument (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (about 500 feet away); The Onward Rush to Victory or Defeat (about 600 feet away); "Back Boys, For God's Sake Move Back;" (about 600 feet away); The 19th Indiana Infantry (about 600 feet away); Longstreet's Command (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. The tablet text identifies Sedgwick's Division of Sumner's II Federal Corps, which was the target of the McLaws' Confederate divisional attack mentioned.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Starke's Brigade
Hagerstown Pike near the Northeast Corner of the West Woods image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. Hagerstown Pike near the Northeast Corner of the West Woods
Starke's Brigade marker is on the left. During the counterattacks against the Federal I Corps' morning advance, Starke's Brigade wheeled from a position to the west (left) and fronted the Pike here, facing east.
. General Starke assumed command of Jackson's Division when General J.R. Jones was incapacitated. Replacing Starke was Col. Jessie Williams of the 2nd Louisiana. Williams was wounded about the same time Starke was killed, and replaced by Col. Leroy Stafford of the 9th Louisiana. (Submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. William E. Starke. William Edwin Starke (1814 – September 17, 1862) was a wealthy Gulf Coast businessman and a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was killed in action at the Battle of Antietam while commanding the famed "Stonewall Division," a unit first made famous under Stonewall Jackson. (Submitted on October 16, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Brig. General William E. Starke (1814-1862) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
4. Brig. General William E. Starke (1814-1862)
A strong Union attack on the morning of September 17 drove back the Confederate lines. Starke was shot three times and died within an hour.
Starke's Brigade Wheels into Action image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
5. Starke's Brigade Wheels into Action
From near the Philadelphia Brigade monument looking out to the old Hagerstown Pike (Dunker Church Road). Starke's Brigade was holding the tree line to the right at daybreak. With the Federal advance down the Hagerstown Pike, the Brigade wheeled across the fields here and confronted the Federals on the pike in the distance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 733 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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