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McDowell in Highland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Village of McDowell

Battle of McDowell

 

—1862 Valley Campaign —

 
Village of McDowell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
1. Village of McDowell Marker
Inscription. Union troops camped in the fields south of here between April 17, 1862, and the Battle of McDowell on May 8. They deployed artillery, including “two twelve pounders [that] were planted on the plateau in the read of [the church] so as to cover the bridge” over Bullpasture River. After the battle, wounded of both armies were cared for in the church. The dead were buried in its cemetery, across modern U.S. 250 (the old Staunton-to-Parkersburg Turnpike).

The house of Confederate Capt. Felix Hull is to the northwest facing the turnpike. It was Federal headquarters before the battle and Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson’s headquarters afterward. U.S. Gen. Robert C. Schenck probably wrote the message below from that building.

The home of Hull’s brother, George Washington Hull, just west of the turnpike, also served as a hospital after the battle. A Virginia Military Institute cadet, who arrived on may 9, later recalled, “There was a dead man laid on top of the piano, and in the dining-room on the table there was a litter with a man on it…. He died after about half an hour…. I was ordered to bury the two of them, which I did. They found a resting place under a big sugar maple along the bank of the river.”

That same day, Jackson pursued the Federals west on the Staunton-to-Parkersburg Turnpike, veering
Village of McDowell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
2. Village of McDowell Marker
north toward Franklin on present day State Route 629.

“There is not a particle of forage here. The last has been given our, and all the horses of cavalry, artillery, and others have been without food today. This place is otherwise untenable and unfit for military defense. The rebels have appeared on the hills over-looking us today and we have shelled and had skirmishing, with no particular result…. If our horses starve a day longer they will not be able to draw away the train or carry us off.” – Gen. Robert C. Schenk, May 8, 1862.
 
Erected by Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation and Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 19.917′ N, 79° 29.346′ W. Marker is in McDowell, Virginia, in Highland County. Marker is at the intersection of Bullpasture River Road (County Route 678) and Highland Turnpike (U.S. 250), on the right when traveling west on Bullpasture River Road. Click for map. Marker is at the entrance to the Presbyterian Church parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Dowell VA 24458, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of McDowell (within shouting distance of
Detail From the Marker - Battle Diagram image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 2, 2010
3. Detail From the Marker - Battle Diagram
this marker); McDowell VA - May 8, 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.8 miles away); Commemorating The Battle Of McDowell (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in McDowell.
 
More about this marker. On the right is a map showing the unit locations during the battle of McDowell. A larger map shows other Civil War related sites in the area. To the far right are portraits of Generals Schenck and Jackson.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Sitlington's Hill, just to the east of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
4. Sitlington's Hill, just to the east of the marker
Soldiers' burial marker in church cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
5. Soldiers' burial marker in church cemetery
Sitlington Hill image. Click for full size.
By David Graff, September 11, 1999
6. Sitlington Hill
The battle was fought south of the highway on these heights.
Soldiers' burial marker in church cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
7. Soldiers' burial marker in church cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,224 times since then and 55 times this year. Last updated on , by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia.   7. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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