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Eden in Rockingham County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Leaksville Cotton Mill

Cloth for Sale

 

—Confederate Lifeline —

 
Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
1. Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker
Inscription.
Former Gov. John Motley Morehead built the Leaksville cotton factory here in 1839. Water from the nearby Smith River rapids powered the stone mill. In May and June 1861, the factory furnished 1,700 yards of osnaburg (a coarse, strong cloth developed in Osnabruck, Germany, by the 16th century) for uniforms for Confederate infantry companies commanded by Capts. John H. Boyd, Thomas T. Slade, and Giles P. Bailey. That winter, the factory also made 500 twelve-man tents for the Confederate forces. Known as Sibley tents for their inventor, Gen. Henry H. Sibley, who sided with the Confederacy, they were also called “bell” tents because of their shape.

When authorities ordered additional cloth from Morehead, he refused even after they threatened to confiscate the mill because sales to civilians were more profitable. After the younger male employees were conscripted into military service, Morehead used older men, women, children, and slaves to manufacture cloth. He finally closed the mill when all able-bodied men under fifty were forced to serve. Morehead later convinced Confederate authorities to detail two older men to work in the mill and resumed the production of cloth for sale to civilians.

After Morehead died in 1866, his son James Turner Morehead managed the Leaksville factory. The original structure burned
Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
2. Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker
in 1893, and a brick mill was built on the site using the rock from the old building as a foundation. The mill was demolished in 1992, leaving only the stone foundation.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 30.283′ N, 79° 45.599′ W. Marker is in Eden, North Carolina, in Rockingham County. Marker is on Church Street (State Highway 700) east of Morgan Road, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located in the Governor Morehead Park. Marker is in this post office area: Eden NC 27289, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Calcium Carbide (within shouting distance of this marker); Barnett Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Luther H. Hodges (approx. half a mile away); Annie Eliza Johns (approx. 0.9 miles away); “Land of Eden” (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named “Land of Eden” (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Land of Eden (approx. one mile away); “River boat Men: Dan River, 1792 – 1892” (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Eden.
 
More about this marker.
Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
3. Leaksville Cotton Mill Marker
The right side of the marker contains a photograph of the “Leaksville cotton mill built in 1839.”
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Marker in the Governor Morehead Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
4. Marker in the Governor Morehead Park
Remains of the Leaksville Cotton Mill image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
5. Remains of the Leaksville Cotton Mill
These stone foundations are all that remains of the Leaksville Cotton Mill.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 321 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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