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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Monterey in Monterey County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

El Castillo Site

 
 
El Castillo Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 29, 2013
1. El Castillo Site Marker
Inscription. This old Spanish fort began as eleven guns behind a crude parapet of logs overlooking the anchorage of Monterey Bay in 1972. The battery was strengthen and enlarged over the years and served as the principal fort in Monterey for both the Spanish and the Mexicans. It was later replaced by the larger fort farther up the hill at the beginning of the American Era in 1848. The El Castillo site was excavated by archeologists in 1967 and re-covered with earth to protect it. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Location. 36° 36.364′ N, 121° 53.719′ W. Marker is in Monterey, California, in Monterey County. Marker can be reached from Corporal Ewing Road. Click for map. This marker is located in the Presidio de Monterey to the east of Corporal Ewing Road on a small knoll overlooking Monterey Bay. Marker is in this post office area: Monterey CA 93944, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Here ... landed Very Rev. Father Junipero Serra (a few steps from this marker); The Argentine Navy (within shouting distance of this marker); Bouchard Monument (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); El Castillo de Monterey (within
El Castillo Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 29, 2013
2. El Castillo Site Marker
shouting distance of this marker); Presidio of Monterey Museum (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); 400th Anniversary of the Naming of Monterey Bay by Gen. Sebastián Vizcaíno (about 600 feet away); Don Caspar de Portolá (about 600 feet away); Crescent Brand Sardine Company (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Monterey.
 
Also see . . .  History of the Presidio. The Monterey Bay area was colonized by a small Spanish expedition that reached Monterey Bay in May 1770. Captain Don Gaspar de Portola commanded the military component of this expedition, and Franciscan Father Junipero Serra was in charge of the religious element. (Submitted on February 8, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitary
 
Alexis Nino Burial Site image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, January 29, 2013
3. Alexis Nino Burial Site
This nearby cross marks the 1770 burial site of Alexis Nino, the first non-native burial in the Monterey area.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 330 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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