Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Raleigh in Wake County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Birthplace of Andrew Johnson

 
 
Birthplace of Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 8, 2013
1. Birthplace of Andrew Johnson Marker
Inscription.
Birthplace
of
Andrew Johnson

Andrew Johnson, 17th President of the United States, was born in this house on December 29, 1808. At that time the house stood on Fayetteville Street.

In July 1904, it was purchased by the Colonial Dames and later presented to the City of Raleigh.
 
Location. 35° 47.58′ N, 78° 37.977′ W. Marker is in Raleigh, North Carolina, in Wake County. Marker is at the intersection of Cedar Street and Wake Forrest Road, on the left when traveling west on Cedar Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Raleigh NC 27601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrew Johnson (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Breastworks (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Leonidas L. Polk (approx. 0.4 miles away); Peace College (approx. 0.4 miles away); Josiah W. Bailey (approx. half a mile away); Jane McKimmon (approx. half a mile away); John L. Taylor (approx. 0.6 miles away); Oakwood Cemetery (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Raleigh.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. See the actual location of the birthplace of Andrew Johnson.
 
Also see . . .
Birthplace of Andrew Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 8, 2013
2. Birthplace of Andrew Johnson Marker

1. Biography of Andrew Johnson. The White House website. (Submitted on February 8, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. NCpedia Entry for Andrew Johnson Birthplace. “Whether the authentic building or one constructed at a later date, the house known as the Andrew Johnson Birthplace stood on its original site until the early 1880s. Sometime between 1880 and 1884 Catherine Pool purchased the structure, moved it to lot 33 on Cabarrus Street, and rented it to a black family. Around 1887 the house was first identified as the birthplace of Johnson—a designation promoted, if not created, by Col. Frederick A. Olds, who later founded the Hall of History (precursor to the North Carolina Museum of History). The association of the house with Johnson inspired the Wake County Chapter of the North Carolina Society of the Colonial Dames of America to buy it, for $100, in 1904 and arrange with the city of Raleigh to have it moved to Pullen Park, where it could be preserved as part of the state's heritage.” (Submitted on December 24, 2016.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Birthplace of Andrew Johnson and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 8, 2013
3. Birthplace of Andrew Johnson and Marker
Both markers can be seen in this photo.
House where Andrew Johnson was Born image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 8, 2013
4. House where Andrew Johnson was Born
Second Marker on Andrew Johnson Birth House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 8, 2013
5. Second Marker on Andrew Johnson Birth House
Raleigh
Historic Site

Andrew Johnson House
before 1808
Andrew Johnson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
6. Andrew Johnson
This portrait by Washington B. Cooper hangs in the National Portrait Gallery.

“A onetime tailor whose wife had taught him to read, Andrew Johnson had a gift for public speaking that launched him on a successful political career leading to a Senate seat in 1856. In 1864, Abraham Lincoln, in a gesture of unity, chose Johnson — a southern Democrat from Tennessee but a staunch defender of the Union — as his running mate. When Johnson succeeded to the presidency after Lincoln's assassination in April 1865, it became clear that his view of Reconstruction, which would return power to the white southern planters and allow returning southern states to deprive freed slaves of their rights, clashed not only with Lincoln's views but with the Republican majority in Congress. The resultant clash led to his impeachment, from which he survived conviction by only one vote.

Washington B. Cooper was a leading Tennessee portraitist, and Johnson sat for him on several occasions. Although this likeness is undated, Johnson's apparent age in the picture suggests that it was painted during his presidency.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 455 times since then and 56 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on December 28, 2016.
Paid Advertisement