Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

“Decision at the Crossroads” Corinth: October 4, 1862

 
 
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
1. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
Inscription. On the morning of October 4, 1862, nearly 20,000 Confederates under Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn launched a massive assault on Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans' 20,000 Federal soldiers defending the interior line of Corinth's entrenchments. Attacking from the north and northwest, the Confederates breached the Union line at Battery Powell. A fierce street battle developed as rebel fought yankee from house to house as the fighting pressed into town.

Here in front (north) of the Tishomingo Hotel, (depicted in the left center of the painting), several hundred Arkansans from Chales W. Phifer's and John C. Moore's Confederate brigades, who had managed to slip past heavily defended Battery Robinett, located to the northwest, joined the Missourians and Mississippians of William H. Moore's Confederate brigade, who had fought their way south from Battery Powell to reach the crossroads. For a brief, triumphant moment the Confederates held the vital rail junction. However, Rosecrans' Federals soon rallied to repel them.

Colonel John V. Du Bois' Illinois brigade, initially driven south beyond the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, hastily reformed to spearhead the Union counterattack. Pressing past the Tishomingo Hotel, the Federals swarmed northward across the tracks to collide with the Confederates occupying the railyard. Colonel
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
2. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
William H. Moore (mounted in center of painting) was shot down and killed near the depot, as Du Bois' charge hurled the Southerners back into the town square. Thousands of Union troops, located to the east and west, soon joined the counterattack and converged their fire onto the square.

Overwhelmed by the massive Federal reserves, the Confederates in town were caught in a deadly crossfire. Captain Edward H. Cummins, a Confederate staff officer, sadly reported, "Our lines melted under their fire like snow in thaw." Heavily outnumbered, the Southern troops were driven from the town in disorder, and scores of men gave themselves up rather than run the deadly gauntlet back to their own lines. By early afternoon, Van Dorn's army was in full retreat. The Confederate offensive on the strategic Corinth railroad junction had been defeated. For the numbers engaged, the two-day battle was one of the war's bitterest fights. Union losses totaled 2,359, and Confederate 4,838.

*The flag in the center of the painting is the flag of the Confederate Army of the West, also known as the Van Dorn Corp pattern flag. A red flag, edged with yellow fringe, bearing a yellow crescent in the upper corner next to the staff, with 13 yellow stars distributed on it.
 
Erected by Corinth is part of the Civil War Discovery Trail.
 
Location.
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
3. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
34° 56.085′ N, 88° 31.308′ W. Marker is in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection of Jackson Street and Cruise Street, on the right when traveling south on Jackson Street. Click for map. Marker is in a parking lot on the north side of Jackson Street along its west edge. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. View Toward Batteries Robinett and Williams (within shouting distance of this marker); Corinth Panorama -- 1862 (within shouting distance of this marker); "A beehive of activity..." (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Troops at Corinth (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Tishomingo Hotel (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of the Corinth House Hotel (about 300 feet away); Corinth (about 400 feet away); Site of the Provost Marshal's Office (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Corinth.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
4. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
5. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 18, 2012
6. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
The flag in the center of the painting is the flag of the Confederate Army of the West, also known as the Van Dorn Corp pattern flag. A red flag, edged with yellow fringe, bearing a yellow crescent in the upper corner next to the staff, with 13 yellow stars distributed on it. This flag can be seen at Corinth's Interpretive Center.
"Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, March 18, 2011
7. "Decision at the Crossroads" Corinth: October 4, 1862 Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 875 times since then and 44 times this year. Last updated on , by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   7. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement