Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Aiken in Aiken County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Coker Spring

 
 
Coker Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
1. Coker Spring Marker
Inscription. The freshwater spring 1/2 mi. SE was used by prehistoric Indians. It was deeded to the town of Aiken in 1844 by William Perroneau Finley (1803-1876) and furnished Aiken┤s drinking water throughout the 19th century. A regular stop on the stagecoach route from Abbeville to Charleston, it helped make Aiken a popular health resort. William Gilmore Simms described it in 1843 as “a fountain of delicious water, which is equally cold and unfailing.”

(Reverse text)
The brick springhouse, covered in stucco, dates from the early 19th century and features Greek Revival architectural elements. During the Civil War Confederate soldiers who camped nearby were frequent visitors to Coker Spring. The springhouse and its retaining walls, neglected by the turn of the 20th century, were restored in 1972 after archaeological excavations on the site. Coker Spring was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.
 
Erected 2013 by Erected by the Brig. Gen. Barnard E. Bee Camp No. 1575, Sons of Confederate Veterans. (Marker Number 2-46.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 33° 
Coker Spring Marker, Reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
2. Coker Spring Marker, Reverse side
33.321′ N, 81° 43.432′ W. Marker is in Aiken, South Carolina, in Aiken County. Marker is at the intersection of South Boundary Avenue SE and Newberry Street, on the right when traveling east on South Boundary Avenue SE. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Aiken SC 29801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The One Room Schoolhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Hitchcock Woods (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hofmann (about 500 feet away); Aiken County Museum (about 600 feet away); Aiken County Courthouse Bell (about 600 feet away); Whitney Park (about 600 feet away); Transit Of Venus Observatory Structure, 1882 (about 600 feet away); Aiken Institute (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Aiken.
 
More about this marker. Although typed and casted 2012, marker was erected January 2013
 
Regarding Coker Spring. Coker Spring is a fresh water spring. Archeological remains found near this property suggest that this was probably a water supply for prehistoric Indians. The spring later served as the source of drinking water for the early settlers of Aiken (ca. 1830-1890). The spring is covered by a springhouse, which is constructed of brick, covered with stucco. The front
Coker Spring seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 24, 2012
3. Coker Spring seen today
fašade features a pedimented entranceway with a wide entablature. Stuccoed brick retaining walls extend along the left and right sides of the springhouse. The first recorded owner of Coker Spring was Ephraim Franklin who obtained the spring as part of a 285-acre land grant in 1787. Apparently the spring then changed hands several times. The spring gained prominence as a regular stop on the stagecoach route from Abbeville to Charleston, and also as the major source of drinking water for the town of Aiken which had been chartered in 1835. Eventually, however, the spring fell into ruin. Listed in the National Register January 18, 1978.(South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
National Register of Historic Places:
Coker Spring (added 1978 - - #78002490)
Coker Spring Rd. , Aiken
♦ Historic Significance: Information Potential, Event
♦ Area of Significance: Historic - Aboriginal, Social History
♦ Cultural Affiliation: None Listed
♦ Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1875-1899, 1825-1849, 1800-1824, 1750-1799, 1000-500 AD
♦ Owner: Local
♦ Historic Function: Domestic, Landscape
♦ Historic Sub-function: Conservation Area, Park, Secondary Structure
♦ Current Function: Landscape
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
Coker Spring Marker, looking west along South Boundary Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
4. Coker Spring Marker, looking west along South Boundary Avenue
see relationship another marker shown.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Coker Spring Marker at South Boundary Avenue SE and Newberry Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
5. Coker Spring Marker at South Boundary Avenue SE and Newberry Street
Coker Spring image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History., circa . 1880
6. Coker Spring
The first spring house was built at Coker Spring in 1800. The origin of the spring's name is unknown. At various times, it also was known as Cocoa Spring, Cold Spring and Cooker Spring.
Coker Spring Prior to Excavation, 1972 image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History., `
7. Coker Spring Prior to Excavation, 1972
Coker Spring Excavated Spring, 1972 image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, `
8. Coker Spring Excavated Spring, 1972
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 670 times since then and 99 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement