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Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Loudoun County Court Square

Wartime in Leesburg

 
 
Loudoun County Court Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 13, 2013
1. Loudoun County Court Square Marker
Inscription. Before the war, the courthouse square was the location of slave auctions and militia recruiting activities. On October 21, 1861, after the Battle of Ball's Bluff, more than 500 Union prisoners, including Col. Milton Cogswell, 42nd New York Infantry, were brought here, taunted, and marched off to Richmond.

The Confederates evacuated Leesburg on March 7, 1862. The next morning, Union Gen. John W. Geary and his men marched in from Waterford as the townspeople glared. Northern reporter Henry Morhous described Leesburg as "a perfect sneering nest of rebels," adding, "They insulted soldiers in every way they thought safe... The ladies were the most outspoken." On September 4, two days after Union and Confederate cavalry skirmished at this intersection and then moved north, Leesburg citizens cheered as Gen. Robert E. Lee's army marched in. On September 17, Lt. Col. Judson Kilpatrick led the 2nd New York Cavalry into town after shelling it.

Mississippi infantrymen fired at the Union gunners from the Valley Bank building behind you. Loudoun's own 35th Virginia Cavalry under Lt. Col. Elijah V. White drove the New Yorkers off. On October 13, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry herded 1,200 captured horses past here en route to the Shenandoah Valley.

On April 29, 1864, a detail of Mosby's Rangers stopped at Pickett's Public House, which
Loudoun County Court Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 13, 2013
2. Loudoun County Court Square Marker
stood to the right of the courthouse. When the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry rode in from behind you, the Rangers skedaddled; only three escaped. Johnny DeButts tried to shoot his way to his horse but was wounded and captured.
 
Erected 2013 by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 6.92′ N, 77° 33.81′ W. Marker is in Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is at the intersection of Market Street (Business State Highway 7) and King Street (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling west on Market Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Loudoun County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 0.2 miles away); Leesburg (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Tolbert Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lee Comes to Leesburg (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Depot (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Stone Church Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Osterburg Mill (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Leesburg.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 565 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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