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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

James Edward Oglethorpe

Founder of Augusta

 
 
James Edward Oglethorpe Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
1. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker
Inscription.
James Edward Oglethorpe was
descended from aristocratic
English family. As a young man
he represented the borough of
Haslemere in Parliament, where he led
inquires into prison conditions and
became interested in social reforms.

(Picture included):
Oglethorpe, the father of Georgia


He became a leading member of The
Trustees for Establishing the Colony of
Georgia in America,
with the idea of
setting up a colony to offer a new start for
"the better sort of indigent" and to
provide a military buffer against the
Spanish in Florida and the French in the
Alabama country. In practice the
idealistic system of the Trustees proved
impractical, and from the beginning very
few Georgia's settlers were charity
colonists.

The Father of Georgia sailed to America
with the first wave of settlers, and
founded five towns, including Augusta.

In 1736 he instructed Surveyor
Noble Jones to lay out the town,
named after Princess Augusta,
wife of the Prince of Wales.

(Picture included):
Oglethorpe's letter to Surveyor Noble Jones
 
Location. 33° 28.56′ N, 81° 57.958′ W. Marker is in Augusta
Oglethorpe, the father of Georgia image. Click for full size.
By James Edward Oglethorpe Marker, `
2. Oglethorpe, the father of Georgia
, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is on Broad Street (Georgia Route 104/28), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located between 8th and 9th Streets at Augusta Commons. Marker is in this post office area: Augusta GA 30901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General James Edward Oglethorpe (within shouting distance of this marker); James Brown (Plaza) (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonial Augusta (within shouting distance of this marker); Original Augusta Common - 1736 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Makepeace Thackeray (about 500 feet away but has been reported missing); The Mayham Tower (about 500 feet away); Augusta Cotton Exchange (about 500 feet away); A Memorial To Eli Whitney (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Augusta.
 
Also see . . .  James Edward Oglethorpe. (New Georgia Encyclopedia) Georgians still remember James Edward Oglethorpe in many ways. His name adorns Oglethorpe County, two towns (including Oglethorpe), Oglethorpe University, and numerous schools, streets, parks, and businesses. (Submitted on March 13, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Oglethorpe's letter to Surveyor Noble Jones image. Click for more information.
By James Edward Oglethorpe Marker, `
3. Oglethorpe's letter to Surveyor Noble Jones
Jones and his family were original settlers in Georgia, arriving in Savannah with founder James E. Oglethorpe on February 1, 1733. As a middle-class carpenter from England, Jones would perform a variety of roles in the new colony of Georgia including: constable, physician, surveyor, Indian agent, soldier, member of the royal council, treasurer, and senior justice of the province. (Georgia Historic Marker 25-100)
Click for more information.
James Edward Oglethorpe Marker seen along east promenade at Augusta Commons image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2013
4. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker seen along east promenade at Augusta Commons
Oglethorpe Monument, focal point of Augusta Commons image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 3, 2013
5. Oglethorpe Monument, focal point of Augusta Commons
General
James Edward
Oglethorpe
1696 - 1785
Father of Georgia
Founder of Augusta

 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 383 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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