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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

First Ship into San Francisco Bay

 
 
First Ship into San Francisco Bay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 23, 2013
1. First Ship into San Francisco Bay Marker
Inscription. On August 5 1775, the Spanish Packet San Carlos, under the command of Lieutenant Juan Manuel Ayala, became the first ship to sail into San Francisco Bay. A month and a half was spent in surveying the Bay from its southern most reaches to the northern end of present-day Suisun Bay. The San Carlos departed on September 18, 1775.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 236.

Plaque placed by the State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the San Francisco Twin Bicenntennial, Inc., August 5, 1975.
 
Erected 1975 by California State Department of Parks and Recreation and The San Francisco Twin Bicentennial, Inc. (Marker Number 236.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Historical Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 37° 48.405′ N, 122° 25.362′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from Beach Street north of Larkin Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrea's Fountain (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Clock Tower
<i>Greetings Across the Water</i> image. Click for full size.
By National Park Service, August 24, 1775
2. Greetings Across the Water
This mural is found in the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park Visitor Center (about 500 ft. east of the marker). The mural's caption reads: On the morning of August 24, 1775, the Friar Santa Maria noted in his journal that eight Huchiun men in two tule canoes, Ohlone from the East Bay, came alongside the San Carlos and opened their visit with a formal ritual greeting before coming aboard. The San Carlos remained anchored in Ayala Cove during most of the mapping expedition.
(about 400 feet away); The Carpenter Shop... (about 500 feet away); The Dolphin Swimming and Boating Club (about 500 feet away); The South End Rowing Club (about 600 feet away); Triple-Expansion Steam Engine (about 700 feet away); Steam Donkey Engine (about 700 feet away); San Francisco Bay "Ark" (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Also see . . .  The Spanish Era - Angel Island Conservancy. In August 1775, Lt. Juan Manuel de Ayala brought his ship, the San Carlos, into San Francisco Bay, and anchored in what is now Ayala Cove. His mission was to develop an accurate description of the bay that future Spanish ship captains could rely on. Ayala’s pilot, Don Jose’ de Canizares, explored the bay in the ship’s launch, and did the necessary map work – the first map ever made of the magnificent and now world-famous harbor. The San Carlos remained at anchor beside the little island that Ayala christened Isla de Los Angeles (Spanish for Island of the Angels), following a practice then common among Catholic explorers
First Ship Marker, Balclutha, Alcatraz, and Angel Island image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 23, 2013
3. First Ship Marker, Balclutha, Alcatraz, and Angel Island
In the foreground is the marker, and visible immediately behind it is the Balclutha, a three-masted square-rigger built in 1886. Behind that is Alcatraz Island, with the federal penitentiary (1934-1963) visible, And finally behind that is the south side of Angel Island. The San Carlos anchored off the north side of Angel Island, in what is now known as Ayala Cove. (Note the telephoto effect makes the distant objects appear considerably closer than they are.)
of naming sites for the religious feast days nearest to the time of discovery.
(Submitted on April 1, 2013.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 375 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   3. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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