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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vancouver in Clark County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Esther Short

Esther Short Park

 
 
Esther Short Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 29, 2007
1. Esther Short Marker
Inscription. After marrying Amos Short in 1829, Esther (Clark) Short set out on the adventure of her life! Originally from Tioga County, Pennsylvania, Esther Short, who was ½ Algonquin Indian, her husband Amos and 10 children traveled west to Linton, Oregon in 1845 and moved again to the present site of downtown Vancouver in 1847. In 1847, this downtown area was under the Treaty of Occupation (1818-1846 England and America shared rights of the territory). The Shortís claim included most of Vancouver west of the Witness Tree on the banks of the Columbia River which later became Main Street to what is now Fourth Plain Blvd. Hudsonís Bay Company officials at the fort looked at their new neighbors with resentment and tried hard to evict Amos and Esther, by destroying their fences and other means. Once while Amos was away, they loaded Esther and her children in a boat and set them adrift on the Columbia. Somehow they made their way back to shore. After that Amos kept a gun and used it—once killing two men. He was found by a court that he acted in self defense. Amos, to further his income, took a load of potatoes to San Francisco, but drowned in 1853 when the “Vandalia” (the ship he was on) sunk at the mouth of the Columbia River on his return trip. Following his death, Esther continued helping to build Vancouver; then
Esther Short Photo image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 29, 2007
2. Esther Short Photo
known as Columbia City, and in 1855 donated 5.4 acres for a public square. It is the oldest park in the state of Washington and is considered to be the oldest designated city park in the West. She also donated a long riverfront section for a public wharf which is now owned by the Port of Vancouver. Vancouver was incorporated two years later on January 23, 1857. Esther died June 28, 1862.
 
Erected by City of Vancouver Washington, Clark County Historical Society, Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation.
 
Location. 45° 37.555′ N, 122° 40.444′ W. Marker is in Vancouver, Washington, in Clark County. Marker is at the intersection of Columbia Street and W 6th Street, on the right when traveling south on Columbia Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vancouver WA 98660, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Captain George Vancouver Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away); Captain George Vancouver Monument Plaza (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Red Cross Convalescent House (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Post Hospital (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Artillery Barracks (approx. 0.4 miles away);
The Pioneer Mothers Statue image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 29, 2007
3. The Pioneer Mothers Statue
The Sutler's Store (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Infantry Barracks (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. James Mission (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Vancouver.
 
Also see . . .  Esther Clark Short and her family settle near Fort Vancouver on December 25, 1845. (Submitted on April 7, 2013, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
The Pioneer Mothers. Erected in Memory of the Pioneer Mothers through the gift of Mr. and Mrs. E. G image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 29, 2007
4. The Pioneer Mothers. Erected in Memory of the Pioneer Mothers through the gift of Mr. and Mrs. E. G
The Pioneer Mothers Statue from the street image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, September 29, 2007
5. The Pioneer Mothers Statue from the street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 339 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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