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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Great Falls in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

American Indians of the Potomac River

Riverbend Park

 

—Potomac River Gorge Interpretive Trail —

 
American Indians of the Potomac River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
1. American Indians of the Potomac River Marker
Inscription. Prehistoric people arrived along the shores of the Potomac River some 13,000 years ago. Slowly they transformed from semi-nomadic hunters into farmers and fishermen. Eventually, a group called the Nacotchtanks became the dominant tribe of the Washington D.C. area.

The Potomac River was a heavily traveled trade route by American Indians. In fact the word Nacotchtank translates to mean “at the trading town.”
 
Erected by Fairfax County Park Authority.
 
Location. 39° 1.073′ N, 77° 14.734′ W. Marker is in Great Falls, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from Potomac Hills Street 0.6 miles east of Jeffery Road. Click for map. Marker is along the Potomac Heritage Trail in Riverbend Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8700 Potomac Hills Street, Great Falls VA 22066, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Washington Aqueduct (approx. 1.2 miles away in Maryland); Great Falls Tavern (approx. 1.2 miles away in Maryland); A Lift Lock (approx. 1.2 miles away in Maryland); Creating a National Park (approx. 1.3 miles away in Maryland);
American Indians of the Potomac River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
2. American Indians of the Potomac River Marker
Potomac River (approx. 1.5 miles away in Maryland); Olmsted Island (approx. 1.5 miles away in Maryland); The Patowmack Canal (approx. 1.6 miles away); People and the Potomac (approx. 1.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Great Falls.
 
Also see . . .
1. Nacotchtank. in Wikipedia. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. Ancient Washington. American Indian Cultures of the Potomac Valley, Humphrey and Chambers, GWU. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. The Artifacts of the Potomac Valley Indians (pdf file). by Titus Ulke, American Anthropologist,, Volume 31, Issue 1, January-March 1929, Pages 122-129. (Submitted on April 11, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansPaleontology
 
American Indians of the Potomac River image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
3. American Indians of the Potomac River
Drawing by L. Napier
American Indians of the Potomac River image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
4. American Indians of the Potomac River
Drawing by L. Napier
American Indian Lodge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
5. American Indian Lodge
Drawing by L. Napier
American Indians making Dug-out canoes image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
6. American Indians making Dug-out canoes
Drawing by L. Napier
Dug-out Canoe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
7. Dug-out Canoe
In the Park Visitors Center
Dug-out Canoe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
8. Dug-out Canoe
In the Park Visitors Center
Dug-out Canoe sign<br>in the Vistors Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
9. Dug-out Canoe sign
in the Vistors Center
This dug out canoe is the same style used by Virginia Indians. Traveling by canoe allowed Virginia Indians to fish and trade with other tribes throughout the Chesapeake Bay region.
Indians Fishing image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
10. Indians Fishing
Water color by John White, painted in 1585-6, illustrating the use of dug-out canoes, in the vistors center.
Arrow Points image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
11. Arrow Points
for sale in the park visitors center
Jasper Arrowheads Sign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
12. Jasper Arrowheads Sign

These Jasper arrowheads are replicas. Jasper is a type of rock found west of Riverbend Park. Thousands of years ago Native Americans transported jasper for tool making and trade.
.95 each
Arrow Points<br>used by Potomac Valley Indians image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne
13. Arrow Points
used by Potomac Valley Indians
Plate 9, from Ulke, 1929
Map image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 10, 2013
14. Map
You Are Here
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 911 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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