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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bivalve in Cumberland County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds

 
 
Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 2, 2013
1. Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker
Inscription. The Central Railroad of New Jersey built this long complex of 30 sheds in 1904 to process oysters that were harvested from the Delaware Bay. Originally, oysters were shipped in their shells via the railroad. Shucking, or removing oysters from their shells, began in the 1920’s. The railroad knew that they would reap the monetary rewards of building a facility and infrastructure to move oysters efficiently from the water to one’s plate. The sheds housed numerous oyster-related businesses and served as a “main street” for the community.

(Inscription on the left side of the marker)
Back in the day….Before the Bridgton and Port Norris Railroad was completed to Bivalve in 1875 oysters were shipped by boats from a wharf built parallel to the river. By the 1880’s there were building of varying sizes and shapes and a railroad platform. In 1904 the current structure with two-stories was constructed. Throughout the years the roof lines over the wharves and building changed.

Oystermen and packing companies out of here leasing a two-story office store front and storeroom half an alleyway, half a wharf and half a boat slip. Other businesses that supported the oyster industry such as chandleries, meat markets, a post office and lumber yards helped fuel the region’s growth and development. The Bivalve Oyster Shipping
Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 2, 2013
2. Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker
Sheds were listed on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places on December 11, 1995 and on the National Register of Historic Places on February 28, 1996.

In 2001 the Bayshore Discovery Project purchased six of the remaining original 30 sheds with funds from the Cumberland County Empowerment Zone. One shed was purchased in 1995. By 2011, the sheds were restored to their 1920’s appearance with funds provided by the New Jersey Historic Trust and New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Erected by Bayshore Discovery Project.
 
Location. 39° 13.986′ N, 75° 1.968′ W. Marker is in Bivalve, New Jersey, in Cumberland County. Marker is on High Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2800 High Street, Port Norris NJ 08349, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Delaware Bay and River (here, next to this marker); The Schooner AJ Meerwald (here, next to this marker); Ecology in the Watershed (here, next to this marker); Steps to Harvest Oysters and Bring to Market (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Steps to Harvest Oysters and Bring to Market
Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 2, 2013
3. Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker
Old rotten ship.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Maurice River (within shouting distance of this marker); All Shapes, Sizes and Materials (approx. 2.6 miles away); A Guiding Light (approx. 2.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bivalve.
 
More about this marker. This marker is on the property of the Bivalve Center-Bayshore Discovery Project.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 2, 2013
4. Bivalve Oyster Shipping Sheds Marker
Distant photo of shipping sheds.
Bivalve Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 2, 2013
5. Bivalve Center
Welcome to the historic Bivalve Shipping Sheds and Wharves, Delaware Bay Museum and Folklife Center, and homeport to New Jersey’s Tall Ship, the oyster schooner A. J. MEERWALD
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 321 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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