Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Toccoa in Stephens County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

LeTourneau Hall

 
 
LeTourneau Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 17, 2013
1. LeTourneau Hall Marker
Inscription.
A building known as "the board shack" originally stood on the present site of LeTourneau Hall. It was a simple wooden structure that was built a short time after the Haddock Inn fire. It became the residence of Richard and Evelyn Forrest along with the Institute's young women. It also served as the administration building and in 1914, it is where Mrs. Forrest established the Toccoa Falls grammar school.

By the late 1930s, all the cottages along with Stewart Hall were filled to capacity. Dr. Forrest and the Executive Committee made a decision to build a new girl's dormitory but there was no money to fund the project. The Forrests asked the student body and faculty and staff to fast one meal a day and pray that God would provide the money needed to build a new dormitory. In an act of faith, the Institute's boys cleared the area off and broke ground for the new building.

Step by step the Lord supplied the money. Texas businessman R.G. LeTourneau, gave half the amount and the rest came from private donations. The new dormitory contained a dining room, kitchen, gymnasium/auditorium, and rooms for fifty students. The gymnatorium was the largest recreational room on campus. In 1950, the original LeTourneau Hall burned to the ground. Dr. Forrest was away at the time preaching in Roanoke, Virginia, at a large Methodist
LeTourneau Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 17, 2013
2. LeTourneau Hall Marker
church. The title of his message was "I will trust and not be afraid."

After receiving the news about LeTourneau, Richard Forrest said, "I told myself, 'Look here, old man, you'd better begin to practice what you preach.' Then I got down on my knees and spread the matter before the Lord." By 1953, the Lord provided the money needed to rebuild. Dr. Forrest was committed not to begin until he had $100,000 in hand. Friends in Toccoa and around the world donated over $62,000. The balance came from North Carolina businessman David Ovens. This time, according to Dr. Forrest's wishes, it was constructed of brick, concrete, steel, and tile. In other words, nothing that would burn!

This historical marker is placed in honor of the Centennial Celebration 1907-2007. Donated by Brenda (HS 1971) and Mary Kay (HS 1972) Ritchey.
 
Erected 2007 by Brenda and Mary Kay Ritchey.
 
Location. 34° 35.617′ N, 83° 21.433′ W. Marker is in Toccoa, Georgia, in Stephens County. Marker can be reached from Bandy Drive, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Toccoa GA 30577, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); Earl Hall
LeTourneau Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 17, 2013
3. LeTourneau Hall Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Tents (within shouting distance of this marker); Administration Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Woerner World Missions Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Dining Hall & Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); Stewart Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); G.I. Hill & The Steel Buildings (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Forrest Hall - Ball Field (about 300 feet away); Paul & Mary Williams Memorial Chapel (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Toccoa.
 
Also see . . .  R.G. LeTourneau. Robert Gilmour LeTourneau (November 30, 1888 – June 1, 1969), born in Richford, Vermont, was a prolific inventor of earthmoving machinery. (Submitted on April 13, 2013, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
LeTourneau Hall image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 17, 2013
4. LeTourneau Hall
R.G. LeTourneau<br>November 30, 1888 – June 1, 1969 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 17, 2013
5. R.G. LeTourneau
November 30, 1888 – June 1, 1969
David Ovens image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
6. David Ovens
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 261 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement