Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Strasburg in Shenandoah County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cedar Creek

Strategic Crossing

 

—1862 Valley Campaign —

 
Cedar Creek, Strategic Crossing, 1862 Valley Campaign image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, June 3, 2006
1. Cedar Creek, Strategic Crossing, 1862 Valley Campaign
Inscription. Just west of modern route 11 is the Daniel Stickley Farm. The ruins of the Stickley Mills are located beside the creek just below the house. During the war, the Valley Turnpike ran past the brick Stickley house and turned right onto a covered bridge over Cedar Creek. The bridge no longer stands but the original abutments are still visible.

In early March 1862, the Federal army advanced south “up” the Shenandoah Valley in pursuit of Stonewall Jackson’s Confederates. Jackson assigned Col. Turner Ashby’s cavalry to act as his army’s rear guard. Ashby made his stand here at Cedar Creek. Private George Neese of Chew’s “horse battery” recorded the scene here March 18, 1862: “The enemy advanced rapidly and we were ordered to Cedar Creek to oppose their onward march. We put our guns into position about a half mile from the creek on the west side of the pike, on a hill which commanded the bridge and its approaches... When they came within a mile of our position, we opened fire on them with our rifled guns. Their artillery wheeled four guns into battery immediately after we opened and returned our fire. Both sides thundered with a lively exchange for about twenty-five minutes.... Our men burnt the Cedar Creek bridge today before we turned the creek over to the Yanks. The bridge was burning when we were firing
Close Up of Photo On Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, June 3, 2006
2. Close Up of Photo On Marker
on their battery.”

On March 24, Chew and Neese occupied the same position during the retreat from Kernstown. A few months later, on May 24, as the Federals retreated to Winchester, Collis’ Zouaves (Union) were cut off and nearly captured by Jackson when they were left at the bridge to act as a rear guard.

Ashby’s cavalry again burned the bridge behind Jackson’s retreating army on June 1.

(Picture Caption) This covered bridge, rebuilt on the original abutments and photographed prior to 1900, is, according to local historians, a close copy of the span burned by Ashby in March 1862. The bridge would be burned and rebuilt (often the following day) at least four times during the war. It was carried away by the spring floods in 1865.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 0.421′ N, 78° 19.163′ W. Marker is near Strasburg, Virginia, in Shenandoah County. Marker is on Valley Pike (U.S. 11) 0.4 miles north of Quarry Road, in the median. Click for map. Located in the median between the north and southbound lanes of US 11. Marker is in this post office area: Strasburg VA 22657, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Three Markers in the Median of the Valley Pike image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
3. Three Markers in the Median of the Valley Pike
At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Cedar Creek (here, next to this marker); Fort Bowman (here, next to this marker); Frederick County / Shenandoah County (approx. 0.2 miles away); 128th New York Volunteer Regiment (approx. half a mile away); Samuel Kercheval (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Strasburg.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Modern Bridge Spanning Cedar Creek image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
4. The Modern Bridge Spanning Cedar Creek
Cedar Creek image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2007
5. Cedar Creek
While not posing as an involved crossing as larger rivers in the area, the grade down to the creek was significant enough to limit traffic. During the 1864 battle of Cedar Creek, Confederates crossed in this vicinity while advancing on Federal positions on the high ground to the north.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 1,758 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement