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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Petersburg in Pinellas County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Lynching of John Evans

 
 
Lynching of John Evans Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
1. Lynching of John Evans Marker
Inscription.
At this intersection
November 12, 1914
John Evans
a black laborer
from Dunnellon FL
was lynched
condemned by a secret
council of fifteen of
St. Petersburg's most
influential citizens.
He was then turned over
to a mob of fifteen hundred
white residents and
- Murdered -

 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 27° 46.274′ N, 82° 38.789′ W. Marker was in St. Petersburg, Florida, in Pinellas County. Marker could be reached from the intersection of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street and Central Avenue when traveling north. Click for map. The marker was mounted on the north side of a concrete utility pole at the northeast corner of the intersection, approximately two feet above the ground. Marker was in this post office area: Saint Petersburg FL 33701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. S. H. Kress and Co. Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Our Heroes of the World War (approx. half a mile away); Pinellas County Veterans Memorial (approx. half a mile away); The United States Veterans Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Brigadier General Thaddeus Kosciuszko
Lynching of John Evans Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
2. Lynching of John Evans Marker
(approx. 0.6 miles away); St. Mary, Our Lady of Grace Church (approx. 0.6 miles away); Soreno Hotel (approx. 0.8 miles away); Pioneer Park (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in St. Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker was a small aluminium plaque measuring roughly 3x5 inches in size. Unfortunately it has been tagged with graffiti.
 
Regarding Lynching of John Evans. On November 10, 1914, prominent St. Petersburg businessman and developer Edward F. Sherman was shot and killed and his wife Mary was brutally beaten with a pipe. By the next morning, groups of armed, white men were conducting manhunts for the "two negroes" described by Mrs. Sherman. Suspicions landed on Ebenezer B. Tobin and John Evans. Evans had been fired by Mr. Sherman three days earlier. Tobin was jailed in Clearwater, but Evans was detained in St. Petersburg and was twice taken before Mary Sherman, but neither time did she identify him as one of her and her husband's attackers. When blood-spattered clothes were discovered in a rooming house at which Evans had recently stayed, a mob of 1,500 whites overtook the city jail, threatening
Lynching of John Evans Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
3. Lynching of John Evans Marker
Seen near the base of the light pole
to kill the jailer if he did not turn Evans over to them. Evans had a noose put around his neck but initial attempts to hang him were unsuccessful when Evans wrapped his legs around a light pole. At this point an unidentified white woman fatally shot Evans. This commenced a ten minute span during which a large number from the crowd emptied their weapons into Evans' lifeless body.

Ebenezer Tobin was eventually tried and convicted in Clearwater for the murder of Edward Sherman. St. Petersburg was left with an image as a town of violence and vigilantes, and many local leaders were revealed to have been involved. News reports revealed that Evans had been tried and convicted in secret by a committee composed of fifteen of St. Petersburg's most respected citizens.
 
Categories. African AmericansNotable Events
 
Former site of the Lynching of John Evans Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 31, 2013
4. Former site of the Lynching of John Evans Marker
The concrete lamp post to which the marker had been attached has since been replaced by a metal lamp post. Reportedly the marker was given to an African-American history initiative.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 1,152 times since then and 33 times this year. Last updated on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.   4. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 20, 2016.
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