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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ninth Army Corps

Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis’ Division

 
 
Ferrero's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. Ferrero's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Ninth Army Corps
Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division.

Brigadier General Edward Ferrero, Commanding.
Organization.
51st New York Infantry,
51st Pennsylvania Infantry.
21st and 35th Massachusetts Infantry.
September 17, 1862.

On the morning of the 17th, Ferrero's Brigade was in position about a half mile northeast of this point on the Rohrback Farm. About 9 a.m., it moved to the left and, after several changes of position, was ordered to carry the bridge. The 51st Pennsylvania and the 51st New York were formed under cover of the hill overlooking this point; skirmishers were thrown forward to the stone fence above the bridge and behind the fences and trees along the stream below it; and, under cover of the fire from the Federal artillery, the two regiments charged down the hill, carried the bridge and formed, under cover of the bluff, in the road beyond it. The 35th Massachusetts, closely supported by the 21st Massachusetts, followed and ascended the bluff on the right where, later in the day, it was joined by the remainder of the brigade and led the advance to the Otto farm lane, where it became severely engaged and lost heavily in killed and wounded.

Late at night the brigade was relieved by Welsh's Brigade of Willcox's Division and fell back to the banks of the Antietam.
Ninth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Ninth Army Corps Marker

 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 68.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.032′ N, 77° 43.876′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Old Burnside Bridge Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located to the east of stop 9 (Burnside Bridge) of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, in a tablet cluster along the walking trail east of the bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sturgis's Division, Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Fifty-First New York Infantry (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (here, next to this marker); Witness to History (a few steps from this marker); 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 2nd Maryland Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); We Showered the Lead Across that Creek (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
Monument and Tablet Cluster on East End of Burnside Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Monument and Tablet Cluster on East End of Burnside Bridge
From left to right are the Ninth Army Corps Tablet for September 15-16 (Number 56), Ninth Army Corps Tablet for 17 September (Number 57), The 51st New York Monument, Sturgis' Division (Number 58), and Ferrero's Brigade Tablet (Number 68)

1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, IX Corps. Before the war, Ferrero was a dance teacher, who served part time in the New York militia. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Edward Ferrero. Edward Ferrero (January 18, 1831 – December 11, 1899) was one of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States. He also served as a Union Army general in the American Civil War, most remembered for his dishonorable conduct in the Battle of the Crater (July 1864), reported drinking with another general behind the lines, while both their units were virtually destroyed. (Submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Edward Ferrero (1831-1899) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
4. Edward Ferrero (1831-1899)
In the summer of 1862, he served in the army of Maj. Gen. John Pope during the Northern Virginia Campaign, including the Second Battle of Bull Run. In September, he served at the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, where his brigade was a part of the Union IX Corps and stormed Burnside's Bridge. For his personal bravery at Antietam, the dancer-turned-warrior was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on September 19, 1862.
East Side of Burnside Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
5. East Side of Burnside Bridge
Here at the east end of Burnside Bridge, the 51st New York and 51st Pennsylvania Regiments rushed onto the bridge and stormed across to the far side, ending the stalemate which had developed in this sector of the battlefield. The tablet is part of a cluster that flanks the 51st New York Regiment Monument on the right.
Support for the two 51sts image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
6. Support for the two 51sts
From the 11th Connecticut Monument looking at the Burnside Bridge. At around 1 p.m. several regiments were arranged to fire on the Confederates in order to suppress their fire while the 51st New York and the 51st Pennsylvania Regiments prepared to rush the bridge. On the left was the 2nd Maryland Infantry, arrayed along the fence. To their right and in the center of the photo was the 21st Massachusetts. On the right of the photo was the 35th Massachusetts.
View across the Antietam image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 1976
7. View across the Antietam
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,061 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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