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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District, Israel
 

The Roman Cardo

הקארדו הרומי

 
 
The Roman Cardo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
1. The Roman Cardo Marker
Inscription. A remnant of the main street of the Roman city of Antipatris. "Cardo" is the name for the main north-south street of a Roman-era city. Shops lined the Cardo, and at its center it was connected to the Forum, the city's central square. Grooves can be seen in the paving stones, carved over the years by the wheels of vehicles rolling along the street. The lookout tower on the Cardo was constructed during the Ottoman period, long after the street had fallen into complete disuse.
 
Location. 32° 6.298′ N, 34° 55.837′ E. Marker is in Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District. Marker is on Yarkon Park Entrance Roadway just from National Route 483. Click for map. This historical marker is located in the interior of Yarkon Park, along a walking path that leads to the entrance of the Ottoman Fortress, just to the left (south) of the southeastern corner entrance to the fortress. Marker is in this post office area: Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District 48800, Israel.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tel Afeq - Antipatris (within shouting distance of this marker); The Egyptian Governor's Residence (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Regarding The Roman Cardo. I was initially disappointed in my quest to
The Roman Cardo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
2. The Roman Cardo Marker
Close-up view of the text on the historical marker.
see and experience the Roman ruins from the time of Paul, but once I could bring myself to look beyond the Ottoman fortress I was able to see other important groups of ruins. This would include the Roman ruins which are located along the Roman road that runs southeast from the southeastern fortress tower. These Roman ruins aren't nearly as numerous or significant as I had seen in visits to places like Beth Shean or Sepphoris, but I was still pleased to be walking on the very same Roman road that Paul had traveled upon.

Unfortunately, I was unable to see much more of the Roman ruins than what was in the immediate vicinity of the southeast tower of the fortress. Had I more time, I would have liked to have walked to the end of what had been excavated of the Roman road, within the park (see the aerial photograph view of the park that is in the 5th related link).
 
Also see . . .
1. Yarkon Park. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Archaeology in Israel: Tel Afek. This is a link to related information provided by the Jewish Magazine. (Submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Antipatris. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
The Roman Cardo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
3. The Roman Cardo Marker
Close-up view of the illustration that appears on the historical marker.
 

4. Aphek, Antipatris. This is a link to information provided by BiblePlaces.com. (Submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. Afek in the Sharon (Antipatris). This is a link to information provided by BibleWalks.com (Submitted on April 12, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologyRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Roman Cardo Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
4. The Roman Cardo Marker
View of the historical marker located beside the southeastern Ottoman fortress tower, with a view of the Roman Road, trailing off to the southeast, in the background.
The Roman Cardo image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
5. The Roman Cardo
View of the Roman Road, heading northwest, into the base of the tower, that is part of the Ottoman fortress.
The Roman Cardo image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
6. The Roman Cardo
Close-up view of some of the stones in the Roman Road, several of which still show the grooves which formed the ruts in the roadway.
The Roman Cardo image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
7. The Roman Cardo
View of the Roman Roadway (or Roman Cardo), looking southeast from the Ottoman fortress.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 421 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on . Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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