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Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Emory Overton Jackson

1908 - 1975

 
 
Emory Overton Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, April 12, 2013
1. Emory Overton Jackson Marker
Inscription.

Emory Overton Jackson was born on September 8, 1908 in Buena Vista, Georgia to Will Burt and Lovie Jones Jackson. E. O. Jackson and his seven siblings were raised in the middle-class Birmingham enclave of Enon Ridge, located on the west side of town near Birmingham-Southern College. He attended Industrial High School, which was later named A. H. Parker High. In 1928 he enrolled in Atlanta’s Morehouse College, where he served as President of the student government and editor of the newspaper, the Maroon Tiger.

After graduating in 1932, E. O. Jackson taught English and coached basketball at Carver High School in Dothan, Alabama, and briefly at Westfield High School in Birmingham before joining the Birmingham World Newspaper in 1934.

Early in life, E. O. Jackson developed a strong sense and passion for Truth, Justice, Freedom and Equality. He did not believe or absorb the Stereotypical Myths of Racial Superiority and Inferiority. He believed the Bible and the U.S. Constitution that declared “All men are created equal”, and that all men are equal before God and the Law.

In his long tenure as Editor of the Birmingham World from 1940 to 1975, E. O. Jackson was totally engaged in the Fight for Rights and Freedom, and fought and won many auspicious and historic battles. In the final analysis,
Emory Overton Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, April 12, 2013
2. Emory Overton Jackson Marker
E. O. Jackson and others of his generation such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, Attorney Arthur Shores, and many others, paid the price and paved the way for our progress and for the eventual realization of the full freedoms guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

E. O. Jackson never retired. He continued to edit the Birmingham World until September 10, 1975, when he died at the age of 67. He devoted his life, risked his safety, and gave up a normal family life in order to change segregation, discrimination and all manners of injustice. He dedicated his life to the Mission of Achieving Freedom, Equality, Rights and Justice for people of all races, creeds and colors.
 
Erected by Urban Impact, Inc. A City Funded Agency.
 
Location. 33° 30.886′ N, 86° 48.699′ W. Marker is in Birmingham, Alabama, in Jefferson County. Marker is on 17th Street North, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 314 17th Street North, Birmingham AL 35203, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Green Acres Café (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th Avenue District (within shouting distance of this marker); Fourth Avenue Historic District.
Emory Overton Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, April 12, 2013
3. Emory Overton Jackson Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Fraternal Hotel Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brock Drugs Building (about 400 feet away); Eddie James Kendrick (about 400 feet away); Arthur D. Shores (about 600 feet away); Kneeling Ministers (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Birmingham.
 
Also see . . .
1. Emory O. Jackson by Encyclopedia of Alabama. (Submitted on April 23, 2013, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
2. Emory Jackson by Bham Wiki. (Submitted on April 23, 2013, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Civil RightsNotable Persons
 
Emory Overton Jackson image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, April 12, 2013
4. Emory Overton Jackson
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 368 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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