“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pueblo in Pueblo County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)

Teresita Sandoval


Teresita Sandoval Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2013
1. Teresita Sandoval Marker
Inscription. Teresita Sandoval was one of the daring souls that arrived at the Pueblo settlement in 1841. Like other women of that time, she would witness and be partner to changes in her country. She departed from her traditional life as the wife of Manuel Suazo and followed her heart and Mathew Kinkead to the Arkansas River, where her extended family endeavored to establish life at El Pueblo Trading Post (1842). Described as “pretty as a peach,” Teresita captivated another Englishman, Alexander Barclay, who wrote of “TS” in his journals. From his diary a glimpse of their grand undertakings emerges as does her role and contributions. Her life affirms that women moved between cultures, strengthened family and trade alliances, exercised rights under Mexican Law and ventured north for the freedom the frontier promised.
Location. 38° 16.032′ N, 104° 36.623′ W. Marker is in Pueblo, Colorado, in Pueblo County. Marker is at the intersection of North Union Avenue and Richmond Avenue, on the left when traveling north on North Union Avenue. Click for map. It is on the grounds of El Pueblo History Museum, facing the intersection. Marker is in this post office area: Pueblo CO 81003, United States of America.
Other nearby markers.
Teresita Sandoval Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 18, 2013
2. Teresita Sandoval Marker
At least 6 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Pueblo (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Borderland - Pueblo / Railroads - Pueblo Country (about 700 feet away); The Mormon Battalion (approx. 0.9 miles away); Jacob Fowler's Lookout - Fountain City (approx. one mile away); San Carlos de los Jupes (approx. 8.3 miles away); Pueblo - Trail Days / Industrial Frontier - Pinon County (approx. 12.8 miles away).
Also see . . .  Teresita Sandoval. “Teresita Sandoval was born in Taos in the New Mexico Province of New Spain in 1811. At the age of seventeen she married Manuel Suaso. The couple had four children and, in the early 1830s, the family moved to Mora, now Mexican New Mexico, to settle a land grant they received. There, in 1835, Sandoval met Mathew Kinkead, a naturalized Mexican citizen and a Kentucky native. She left her husband to live with Kinkead. The new couple moved to the Arkansas River where they formed a trading partnership with a culturally mixed community. Together this group founded El Pueblo, present day Pueblo, Colorado.” (Submitted on April 23, 2013.) 
Additional comments.
1. Pueblo, Colorado article
Teresita Sandoval (1811–1894) image. Click for full size.
April 18, 2013
3. Teresita Sandoval (1811–1894)
The statue is approximately 3 feet high.
on Teresita Sandoval statue unveiling on September 24, 2011

Teresita Sandoval memorial unveiling scheduled today

Saturday, September 24, 2011 12:00 am


A sculpture of Teresita Sandoval, a pioneer woman who settled in the Pueblo region with her family in the 1840s, will be unveiled at a 2 p.m. ceremony today at Founders Plaza on the grounds of El Pueblo History Museum, 301 N. Union Ave.

The memorial is the second to be dedicated at the plaza. A sculpture of James Beckwourth was dedicated in May during the annual Wild Wild West Festival.

Sandoval and Beckwourth are two of seven people regarded as founders of Pueblo, who will be honored with statues. A third founder, Mathew Kinkead, will be honored early next year.

City Council approved a resolution in early May to name El Pueblo's outdoor plaza area as Founders Plaza.

Today's unveiling of the Sandoval sculpture is being held in conjunction with this weekend's Chile and Frijoles Festival. The memorial is a white cement abstract statue depicting Sandoval as a classic frontier woman. The piece was commissioned by the Urban Renewal Authority of Pueblo as part of its Arts in Public Spaces initiative.

The project was coordinated by the Urban Renewal Authority with the help of the city of Pueblo, Art and Soul Street Gallery and El Pueblo History Museum.

“We are excited to recognize another founder of Pueblo with this artwork,” Urban Renewal Executive Director John R. Batey said. “We are especially proud that this project not only helps beautify our Downtown and generate visitors, but also celebrates Pueblo’s diverse history.”

Teresita Sandoval helped to establish El Pueblo as a settlement rather than just a trading post. She and her daughters were instrumental in bringing stability to the region.

Married at the age of 14, she later left her husband and arrived with her children at the Arkansas River in 1841.

“Teresita Sandoval is a prime example of the early, rugged frontier woman,” said El Pueblo History Museum Director Deborah Espinosa. “Through her strength of character and unyielding sense of adventure, she played a key role in the taming of the American West.”

The artist for the Teresita Sandoval piece is Ted Bueno, a native of Pueblo. He taught 14 years in Pueblo School District 60 and was in administration for 21 years before retiring in 1995.

Visitors to the festival are invited to attend today's ceremony.
    — Submitted February 18, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of San Salvador, El Salvador.

Categories. Hispanic AmericansSettlements & Settlers
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 524 times since then and 167 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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