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Near Burgess in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Hatcher’s Run

To Cut the Remaining Supply Lines, February 5-7, 1865

 
 
The Battle of Hatcher’s Run Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. The Battle of Hatcher’s Run Marker
To Cut the Remaining Supply Lines, February 5-7, 1865
Inscription. By early 1865 the Federal army’s two remaining objectives along the Petersburg front were the Boydton Plank Road, an intermediate wagon supply route into the city, and the South Side Railroad, a major transportation artery from Lynchburg and the Shenandoah Valley. Union forces had already cut the Weldon Railroad as far south as Hicksford (now Emporia), forcing the Confederates to unload supplies at the station there, load them on wagons, and haul them cross-country through the Meherrin River valley to the plank road. This route took them through Dinwiddie Court House on their way to Petersburg.

On February 5, in the seventh offensive movement of the Union siege of Petersburg, Federal commander Ulysses S. Grant sent Brigadier General David McMurtrie Gregg’s cavalry division, supported by Major General Andrew A. Humphreys’ Second Corps and Major General Gouverneur K. Warren’s Fifth Corps, toward Dinwiddie Court House to cut the Confederate supply line. Upon reaching the Hatcher’s Run area, Humphreys took position north of the stream at the Vaughan Road crossing and Armstrong’s Mill. His corps would guard the rest of the army from this location.

Humphreys’ men began entrenching across a small creek known as Rocky Branch. Meanwhile, Confederate Brigadier General Henry Heth’s division, supported on the right by Brigadier General
Civil War Preservation Trust image. Click for more information.
2. Civil War Preservation Trust
Clement Evans’ division of Major General John B. Gordon’s Second Corps, prepared to attack.

Beginning about 3:45 p.m. and lasting more than an hour, the Confederates made three unsuccessful assaults on Humphrey’s line. Though unable to break the Federals, the Southerners continued with sporadic artillery fire until dark.

With Humphrey’s corps hold the Southerners at Hatcher’s Run, Gregg’s cavalry was able to reach the Boydton Plank Road. The Federal horsemen captured fewer than two-dozen wagons before being ordered back to the Vaughan Road with Warren’s troops. The plank road having been scouted, Grant now gave the order to push on for the South Side Railroad. He also sent reinforcements from the Sixth and Ninth Corps to strengthen Humphreys’ position.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Location. 37° 7.484′ N, 77° 29.812′ W. Marker is near Burgess, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker is on Dabney Mill Road (Virginia Route 613), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the 50 acre Hatcher's Run Battlefield preservation tract. Marker is in this post office area: Burgess VA 22432, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brigadier General John Pegram (a few steps from this
Markers on the Hatcher's Run Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Markers on the Hatcher's Run Battlefield
There are several markers for the Battle of Hatcher’s Run at this location.
marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Hatcher’s Run (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Hatcher’s Run (a few steps from this marker); Quaker Road Engagement (approx. 1.7 miles away); Gravelly Run Quaker Meeting House (approx. 1.9 miles away); Raceland (approx. 1.9 miles away); Cattle (Beefsteak) Raid (approx. 2 miles away); White Oak Road (approx. 2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Burgess.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker features a photo of Gen. Gregg with the caption Union General David McMurtrie Gregg commanded the Army of the Potomac’s 2nd Division of Cavalry at Petersburg. Gregg resigned his commission on February 3, 1865, and his resignation was officially accepted on the 9th.

The upper center of the marker has a photo of Gen. Heth, with the caption Confederate General Henry Heth began his war service as a colonel of the 45th Virginia before becoming a general in 1862. He fought at Chancellorsville and was responsible for opening
Hatcher's Run Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Hatcher's Run Battle Map
the Battle of Gettysburg where he was wounded. At Petersburg his division served in General A.P. Hill’s Third Corps.


The right of the marker contains a map of the February 5, 1865 battle, with the caption Confederates launched three unsuccessful attacks on the Union lines between 3:45 and 5 p.m. on February 5. The Confederates fell back to the safety of their trenches that night.
 
Regarding The Battle of Hatcher’s Run. The marker was placed by the Civil War Preservation Trust, and displays their slogan, Help Preserve Battlefields, call CWPT at 1-888-606-1400. At the bottom of the marker is a disclaimer, This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any applications, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Hatcher’s Run. Civil War Preservation Trust. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Hatcher's Run. National Park Site. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Battle of Hatcher's Run. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
4. Hatcher's Run. Feb 5-7
Hatcher's Run Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Hatcher's Run Battlefield
The Battle of Hatcher’s Run marker is on property owned by the Civil War Preservation Trust.
. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on December 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 4,409 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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