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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Maumee in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 / Private Patrick Russell

 
 
41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
1. 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker
Inscription. [Front Side of Marker]: 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812

Near this site, in the War of 1812, stood the British encampment during the First Siege of Fort Meigs from May 1-9, 1813. This marker honors members of the 41st Regiment of Foot who died during the engagement. Killed in action on May 5, 1813 were Privates James Barkley, Richard Booth, William Carpmail, Samuel Cartledge, John Cox, Benjamin Dorman, John Dyer, Edward Graves, and Patrick Russell. Private Edward Billing died of wounds from battle May 6 and Private John Chamberlane expired May 20.

[Reverse Side of Marker]: Private Patrick Russell

At this site on May 5, 1813, American prisoners of war, captured in the engagement now known as "Dudley's Defeat", were exposed to an escalating level of physical violence by American Indian forces allied to Great Britain. The violence reached a level of deadly force as the prisoners were shot, tomahawked, and scalped. Private Russell, of the 41st Regiment of Foot, attempted to intervene in the attack against the unarmed prisoners, but was shot and killed. Following the attack, approximately 40 Americans and Patrick Russell lay dead. For attempting to restrain the actions of others against unarmed prisoners, Russell made the supreme sacrifice.
 
Erected
Private Patrick Russell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
2. Private Patrick Russell Marker
2013 by Fort Meigs Association, Metropolitan Park District of the Toledo Area, 41st Regiment of Foot M.L.H.G., The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 63-48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 34.387′ N, 83° 37.611′ W. Marker is in Maumee, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is at the intersection of River Road and Michigan Avenue, on the left when traveling south on River Road. Click for map. This historical marker is located where Michigan Avenue. dead ends into River Road, on the river side of River Road, in a small, Lucas County MetroPark, which is situated along the west side of the Maumee River. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1900 River Road, Maumee OH 43537, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Miamis (here, next to this marker); Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fort Miamis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Indian Wars (within shouting distance of this marker); British Betray Indian Allies
41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
3. 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker
View, looking southeast, of the historical marker, situated along a park trail, with the remains of the earthwork fortifications from Fort Miamis seen in the distant background.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Miamis During the War of 1812 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Running a Gauntlet (about 400 feet away); A Strategic Location (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Maumee.
 
More about this marker. The city of Maumee had created a park at the site of Fort Miamis in order to protect and preserve a significant portion of the original earthworks that made up the fortification that is discussed on this historical marker. This park became part of the Lucas County Metropark system, and was recently made a part of the National Park System.
 
Regarding 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 / Private Patrick Russell. This historical marker was erected as part of the weekend celebration of the bicentennial anniversary of the Siege of Fort Meigs, on May 3-5, 2013. In addition to this featured historical marker, I included some photos of a number of temporary displays that had been posted at the site as part of celebratory experience.

The text on the temporary "Fort Miamis, a British Outpost" marker reads as follows: "British troops constructed Fort Miamis on
Private Patrick Russell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
4. Private Patrick Russell Marker
View, looking northwest, of the historical marker, situated along a park trail, with the parking lot for the park, and then the intersection of River Road and Michigan Avenue seen in the distant background.
the banks of the Maumee River between April and August of 1794 with the help of local Indians."

"Fort miamis featured four bastions, a river battery, barracks, officers' quarters, supply buildings and a number of shops. The formidable outpost housed over 130 British troops who manned 14 cannons protecting it from all directions. Approaching by land, hostile troops faced an abatis - a 25-foot deep trench lined with rows of 12-inch thick stakes."

Archaeological excavations in 1982 unearthed nails, wall timbers, bottle fragments, regimental buttons, and other artifacts. All that remains today are the earthwork trenches dug around the fort in 1794."


The text on the temporary "British Betray Indian Allies" marker reads as follows: "After U.S. victory at the Battle of Fallen Timbers on August 20, 1794, the retreating American Indians fled to Fort Miamis. But the British troops - betraying earlier assurances - denied their Indian allies access to the fort.

U.S. troops advanced to within a mile and a quarter of the fort on the day of the battle, and General Anthony Wayne approached within pistol-range on August 22.

Confronted with superior firepower and over 180 British and Canadian troops, Wayne chose not to attack the fort or advance on Detroit.

The British abandoned the outpost two years later."


The text on the
41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
5. 41st Regiment of Foot - War of 1812 Marker
View, looking southeast, of the historical marker, situated along a park trail, next to the "Fort Miamis" historical marker.
temporary "Fort Miamis during War of 1812" marker reads as follows: "In the spring of 1813, British troops returned to the site of Fort Miamis to again ally with a determined American Indian Confederacy struggling to expel American settlers from their homeland. The British successfully landed troops and artillery at the dilapidated outpost and set up a camp and base of operations.

In May and July, Indians led by Shawnee Chief Tecumseh and British troops from Fort Miamis attacked U.S. Fort Meigs in present-day Perrysburg. General William Henry Harrison's soldiers repelled both attacks and later that year defeated British and Indian forces at the Battle of the Thames in present-day Ontario, Canada."

These engagements effectively ended hopes for a permanent American Indian Confederacy and British occupation of the American Northwest.


The text on the temporary "Running a Gauntlet" marker reads as follows: "Desperate to break the British and American Indian siege of Fort Meigs, General William Henry Harrison ordered 800 Kentucky Militia under Colonel William Dudley to cross the Maumee River and destroy the british batteries.

After seizing the enemy cannons on May 5, 1813, the undisciplined U.S. soldiers broke into small groups and chased the scattering Indian troops into the thick woods. British soldiers continued firing - killing and wounding
Fort Miami, a British Outpost (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
6. Fort Miami, a British Outpost (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary display marker, posted as part of the bicentennial anniversary of the Siege of Fort Meigs.
many Americans.

The British marched the prisoners to Fort Miamis and forced them to run a gauntlet of Indians. British General Henry Procter did nothing to the massacre, but upon arrival, Shawnee Chief Tecumseh stopped the ordeal and chastised his warriors.

In the end, nearly 650 Americans were killed or captured in what became known as Dudley's Defeat.

 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Miamis. This is a link to information provided by the Touring-Ohio's website. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Fort Miami (Ohio). This lis a ink to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site, Ohio. This is a link to information provided by the National Park Service. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. Siege of Fort Meigs. This lis a ink to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. 41st (Welch) Regiment of Foot. This lis a ink to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

6. The 41st Regiment of Foot Military Living History Group. This is a link to information provided by The
Fort Miami, a British Outpost (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
7. Fort Miami, a British Outpost (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary marker along the park trail that goes back to the site of Fort Miamis. In the background is a view of the remains of the earthwork fortifications from the fort.
41st Regiment of Foot Military Living History Group. (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

7. 41st Regiment Deserters. This is a link to information found on a website hosted by RootsWeb of Ancestory.com (Submitted on May 5, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansWar of 1812
 
British Betray Indian Allies (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
8. British Betray Indian Allies (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary display marker, posted as part of the bicentennial anniversary of the Siege of Fort Meigs.
British Betray Indian Allies (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
9. British Betray Indian Allies (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary marker along the park trail that goes back to the site of Fort Miamis.
Fort Miamis during War of 1812 (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
10. Fort Miamis during War of 1812 (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary display marker, posted as part of the bicentennial anniversary of the Siege of Fort Meigs.
Running a Gauntlet (a temporary) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
11. Running a Gauntlet (a temporary) Marker
View of the temporary display marker, posted as part of the bicentennial anniversary of the Siege of Fort Meigs.
"Fort Miamis during War of 1812" and "Running a Gauntlet" (temporary) Markers image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
12. "Fort Miamis during War of 1812" and "Running a Gauntlet" (temporary) Markers
View of the two temporary display markers, with a distant view of the Maumee River (seen through the trees and undergrowth) in the background.
Siege of Fort Meigs Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
13. Siege of Fort Meigs Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration
View of the speakers platform and audience viewing area for the Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration.
Siege of Fort Meigs Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 4, 2013
14. Siege of Fort Meigs Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration Marker
View of the speakers platform and audience viewing area for the Bicentennial Anniversary Celebration.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 728 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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