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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rochester in Monroe County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Douglass Home

 
 
Douglass Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, May 6, 2012
1. Douglass Home Marker
Inscription. Frederick Douglass, abolitionist and editor of the "North Star", hid many fugitive slaves at his home on this site.
 
Erected 1984 by Rochester Sesquicentennial Committee.
 
Location. 43° 8.126′ N, 77° 36.474′ W. Marker is in Rochester, New York, in Monroe County. Marker is on South Avenue 0.2 miles north of Rockingham Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rochester NY 14620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Frederick Douglass Home Site (a few steps from this marker); Trophy Cannon (approx. mile away); Highland Park (approx. mile away); Frederick Douglass (approx. half a mile away); Hartwell Carver, M.D. (approx. 0.8 miles away); Ninth of November, 1886 (approx. 0.9 miles away); To the Memory of (approx. 0.9 miles away); Civil War Memorial in Mount Hope Cemetery (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Rochester.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
Douglass Home Marker as seen from southern approach image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, May 6, 2012
2. Douglass Home Marker as seen from southern approach
Douglass Home Site Marker as seen from northern approach image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, May 6, 2012
3. Douglass Home Site Marker as seen from northern approach
Frederick Douglass image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Frederick Douglass
This 1844 portrait of Frederick Douglass hangs in the Natinal Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Frederick Douglass became the first nationally known African American in U.S. History by turning his life into a testimony on the evils of slavery and the redemptive power of freedom. He had escaped from slavery in 1838 and subsequently became a powerful witness for abolitionism, speaking, writing, and organizing on behalf of the movement; he also founded a newspaper, the North Star. Douglass's charisma derived from his ability to present himself as the author of his own destiny at a time when white America could barely conceive of the black man as a thinking and feeling human being. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is not only a gripping nonfiction account of one man's struggle for freedom; it is also one of the greatest American autobiographies. This powerful portrait shows Douglass as he grew in prominence during the 1840s.” — National Portrait Gallery.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. This page has been viewed 347 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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