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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Forever Free”

 
 
"Forever Free" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. "Forever Free" Marker
Inscription. The battle was over, but the two armies still faced one another. The Union army was still twice as strong.

General Robert E. Lee, CSA
"If McClellan wants to fight in the monring, I will give him battle again."
Lee stayed at Antietam on more day. Then he went back across the Potomac to Virginia. Lee rebuilt his army and carried on the war for two and a half more years.

Major General George B. McClellan, U.S.A.
"After a night of anxious deliberation, and a full and careful survey of the situation and condition of our army, the strength and position of the enemy, I concluded that the success of an attack on the 18th was not certain."
McClellan did not attack. In November President Lincoln removed him from command because he would not follow Lee to Virginia and fight him.

The dead suffered no more. The wounded had more to endure.

Northern looses were 12,400 killed, wounded, or missing. Southern losses were 10,300.
"The whole region of country between Boonsboro and Sharpsburg is one vast hospital."

President Lincoln said:
"I determined as soon as it (the Rebel army) should be driven out of Maryland, to issue a proclamation of enancipation .... God has decided this question in favor of the slaves."
He issued the Emancipation Proclamation six days after the
Interpretive Markers at Stop 10 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
2. Interpretive Markers at Stop 10
Two interpretive markers stand in front of a battery of artillery at stop 10 of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield.
battle:
"That on the first day of January in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State ... in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free...."
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 39° 27.212′ N, 77° 44.348′ W. Marker was near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker was on Branch Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located at stop 10, the Final Attack, of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker was in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Brown’s (Wise), Virginia Battery (a few steps from this marker); The Final Attack (a few steps from this marker); The Advance Was Made With the Utmost Enthusiasm (a few steps from this marker); "It Is A.P. Hill" (a few steps from this marker); Ninth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command
Cannon, Markers, and Monuments image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. Cannon, Markers, and Monuments
Looking down the barrel of a 12-pdr Field Howitzer, Model 1835, at some of the ground the Federal IX Corps advanced across in the afternoon of the battle. In addition to the interpretive markers beside the wall, in the distance is the 11th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Monument.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays portraits of President Lincoln and Generals Lee and McClellan next to their quotations. A sketch by Walton Tabor, Civil War combat artist depicts the wounded being carried off the battlefield.
 
Regarding “Forever Free”. This marker was replaced by one named "The Advance was made with the Utmost Enthusiasm" (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .  Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,515 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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