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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“It Is A.P. Hill”

 
 
"It Is A.P. Hill" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. "It Is A.P. Hill" Marker
Inscription. Outnumbered Southerners watched the Northern Ninth Corps climb the hills toward them:
"The first thing we saw was the gilt eagle that surmounted the pole, then the top of the flag, next the flutter of the stars and stripes itself, slowly mounting, up it rose, then their hats came in sight, still rising the faces emerged, next a range of curious eyes appeared, then such a hurrah as only the Yankee troops could give broke the stillness and they surged against us."

"Hastily emptying our muskets into their lines, we fled back through the cornfield. Oh, how I ran."


All day long the Southern commander, General Robert E. Lee, had taken troops from south of town to stave off defeat at Dunker Church and Sunken Road. Now the Union Ninth Corps looked down at the town and the Army of Northern Virginia faced destruction. Combat artist Edwin Forbes sketched the 9th New York Regiment (Hawkin's Zouaves) in their distinctive uniforms at this climatic moment.

General Lee saw a column of marching men moving up southwest of town:
"It is A.P. Hill from Harpers Ferry."

Hill's light division left Harpers Ferry at 7:30 a.m. that morning. They marched 17 miles in 8 hours - many fell by the road exhausted. They forded the Potomac River, climbed up Miller's Sawmill Road, and came onto the battlefield shortly before
Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
2. Battle Map
Note the north seeking arrow points to the left of the map. A "you are here" pointer indicates the marker location relative to the unit movements. A battle clock on the upper left indicates the phase of the battle at which the action illustrated here took place.
4 p.m.

Northern observers saw the marching column, and they signaled General Burnside, commanding Ninth Corps:
"Look out well to your left; the enemy are moving a strong force in that direction."
The 16th Connecticut was the regiment on the Union left. They had been in the army three weeks:
"A terrible volley was fired into us. In a moment we were riddled with shot. Orders were given which were not understood. Neither the line-officers nor the men had any knowledge of regimental movements."

Hill's light division rolled up the last Union attack. Ninth Corps retreated to Antietam Creek. The battle was over.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 39° 27.204′ N, 77° 44.351′ W. Marker was near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker was on Branch Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located at stop 10, the Final Attack, of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker was in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named "It Is A.P. Hill" (here, next to this marker); Brown’s (Wise), Virginia Battery (here, next to this marker); The Advance Was Made With the Utmost Enthusiasm
Interpretive Markers at Stop 10 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Interpretive Markers at Stop 10
Two interpretive markers stand in front of a battery of artillery at stop 10 of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield.
(a few steps from this marker); The Final Attack (a few steps from this marker); Ninth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. On the left side of the marker is Edwin Forbes sketch of the 9th New York. In the center is a portrait of Major General A.P. Hill, C.S.A. above an illustration depicting the crossing of the Potomac by his division. On the right is a map illustrating the tactical movements described in the text.
 
Regarding “It Is A.P. Hill”. This marker was replaced by one named "The Final Attack" (see nearby markers).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Branch Avenue Virtual Tour by Markers
 
Also see . . .
Federal Advance over the Ridge Lines image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
4. Federal Advance over the Ridge Lines
From the gunners perspective looking down a 12-pounder Model 1857 "Napoleon" gun at the rolling ridges to the west of Antietam Creek. The Ninth Corps formed a wide arch around the bridgehead formed over the Antietam before advancing between 3:30 and 4 p.m. As described in the citation on the text, the Federals advanced up from the valley in the distance, with their colors held high, in a broad line.
 Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,077 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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