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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Kelly Air Force Base

 
 
Kelly Air Force Base Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, May 11, 2013
1. Kelly Air Force Base Marker
Inscription. As World War I raged in Europe, the United States began to build up and expand its military aviation forces. In his search for a new army aviation training site, Maj. Benjamin Foulois found 700 acres of flat farmland with a water supply near the Missouri-Pacific rail line, then seven miles south of San Antonio. With the help of U.S. Senator Morris Sheppard of Texas, the site was acquired and cleared. Aviation operations began here on April 5, 1917, the day before the United States declared war on Germany.

Kelly Field, named for George Edward Maurice Kelly, the first military pilot killed in a plane crash at nearby Fort Sam Houston in 1911, trained aviators, mechanics and support personnel for war duty. After additional land was acquired, the field was divided into Kelly Number 1 (later renamed Duncan Field) and Kelly Number 2. The Air Service Advanced Flying School, which headquartered at Kelly Number 2, trained pilots including Charles Lindbergh, Curtis LeMay and numerous future Air Force chiefs of staff.

During World War II, Kelly saw a tremendous increase in its civilian and military workforce, including women, who were known as “Kelly Katies.” After the Air Force became an independent military service in 1947, the field became known as Kelly Air Force Base.

Personnel at Kelly were significantly
Kelly Air Force Base Marker Site image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, May 11, 2013
2. Kelly Air Force Base Marker Site
involved with air transport and maintenance during the Korean conflict, the Cold War, Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Once the largest employer in San Antonio, Kelly Air Force Base realigned in 2001 in response to peacetime defense spending cuts.
 
Erected 2001 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 12443.)
 
Location. 29° 22.968′ N, 98° 33.563′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is at the intersection of General Huddnel Drive and Crickett Drive, on the right when traveling north on General Huddnel Drive. Click for map. Directly across the street from static display of a jet fighter. Marker is in this post office area: San Antonio TX 78226, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wilber B. Miller (approx. 0.6 miles away); "Kelly No. 2" Flight Line (approx. 0.9 miles away); USAF Officer Candidate School (approx. 3.5 miles away); OCS Class 62-A (approx. 3.5 miles away); Aviation Cadets (approx. 3.5 miles away); One More Roll (approx. 3.5 miles away); Order of Daedalians / Fighter Aces Association (approx. 3.5 miles away); MTI Monument (approx. 3.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Antonio.
 
More about this marker.
Memorial Park at the Kelly Air Force Base Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, May 11, 2013
3. Memorial Park at the Kelly Air Force Base Marker
The marker is at the entrance to a memorial park which honors the military and civilian heros of Kelly AFB. The park is paved with hundreds of memorial bricks.
 
Categories. Air & SpaceWar, World IWar, World II
 
Bronze busts in memorial park near the Kelly Air Force Base Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, May 11, 2013
4. Bronze busts in memorial park near the Kelly Air Force Base Marker
Bronze busts in memorial park near the Kelly Air Force Base Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, May 11, 2013
5. Bronze busts in memorial park near the Kelly Air Force Base Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. This page has been viewed 636 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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