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Buffalo in Erie County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

In Memory of Millard Fillmore

 
 
In Memory of Millard Filmore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
1. In Memory of Millard Filmore Marker
Inscription. 13th President of the United States of America Born January 7, 1800. Died March 8, 1874 Dedicated by The Millard Fillmore Republican Women's Club Memorial Day May 30, 1932
 
Erected 1932 by Millard Fillmore Republican Women's Club.
 
Location. 42° 55.764′ N, 78° 51.808′ W. Marker is in Buffalo, New York, in Erie County. Marker can be reached from Main Street (New York State Route 5) near Delaware Avenue. Click for map. Marker(s) are deep within Forest Lawn Cemetery. For what it's worth, while the section is fenced in, the gate is not locked. Marker is in this post office area: Buffalo NY 14214, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901) (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mary Morris Burnett Talbert (approx. 0.2 miles away); Frederick Law Olmsted (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ebenezer Walden (approx. mile away); Brigadier General Albert James Myer (approx. mile away); Albert James Myer, M.D. (approx. mile away); Red Jacket (approx. half a mile away); Erastus Granger (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Buffalo.
 
Also see . . .  Millard Fillmore - The White House.
In Memory of Millard Filmore Marker and Monument image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
2. In Memory of Millard Filmore Marker and Monument
(Submitted on May 23, 2013, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Millard Filmore Monument image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
3. Millard Filmore Monument
Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 1) image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
4. Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 1)
Millard Powers Filmore (son) Mary Abigail Filmore (daughter) (click for full text)
Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 2) image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
5. Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 2)
Abigail Powers Filmore (wife) (click for full inscription)
Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 3) image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
6. Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 3)
Millard Filmore (himself) (click for full inscription)
Millard Filmore Monument and Graves image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
7. Millard Filmore Monument and Graves
Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 4) image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
8. Millard Filmore Monument Inscription (Side 4)
Caroline Filmore (second wife) She is who is buried next to him in the Monument & Graves Photo (click for full inscription)
Abigail Powers Filmore headstone image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, April 22, 2013
9. Abigail Powers Filmore headstone
She is buried in this plot, just not next to the president who lays next to his second wife.
Millard Fillmore image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
10. Millard Fillmore
This c. 1843 portrait of Millard Fillmore hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“At the beginning of his administration, Millard Fillmore bestowed his presidential blessing on the Compromise of 1850 Senator Henry Clay's proposal to unite the North and the slave holding South. The ensuing harmony, however, was short-lived. Among the compromise's concessions to the South was the new Fugitive Slave Law, which facilitated the capture of runaway slaves, and Fillmore was determined to enforce it. As northern abolitionists sought to undermine enforcement, tempers on both sides of the issue flared again. The sectional bitterness made a future rupture over slavery all but certain.

Fillmore's portrait by an unidentified artist dates to about the time he retired from the House of Representatives in the early 1840s. In the years following, he devoted himself to reconciling the growing differences among fellow Whigs in his native New York State.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. This page has been viewed 579 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York.   10. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on July 28, 2016.
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