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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pleasant Plains in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Modern Shopper

Lift Every Voice

 

óGeorgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail ó

 
The Modern Shopper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
1. The Modern Shopper Marker
Inscription. Braving a blizzard in February 1936, eager customers lined up to experience a modern, self-service, cash-only supermarket. Nehemiah Cohen and Samuel Lehrmanís Giant Food here on Georgia Avenue was the chainís first. Although the Memphis-born Piggly Wiggly chain pioneered the supermarket concept, it took Giant to capture DC consumers.

Giant moved into the former Park View Market, which had opened in 1923 with 180 tiled stalls. Before the supermarket, food shopping meant stopping at stand-alone bakeries, butcher shops, and other specialty stores, or at stalls inside a market shed. In all cases, shopkeepers filled the orders. Although mom-and-pop stores offered customers credit between paydays and delivered, Giantís efficiency and lower prices nearly made small specialty stores obsolete.

After the arrival of supermarkets, small corner groceries continued to serve neighborhoods. Many were owned by Jewish families who belonged to the city-wide buying cooperative District Grocery Stores (DGS for short). In the 1930s, three Jewish groceries operated on the 3300 block of Georgia, and at least 15 along the route of this trail.

The ornate police substation at 750 Park Road (to your left) opened in 1901 as the 10th Precinct headquarters, serving 15 square miles of “suburbs” stretching north
The Modern Shopper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
2. The Modern Shopper Marker
from Florida Avenue to the District line, and between Benning Road and Rock Creek.

On your way to Sign 19, notice 3641 Georgia Avenue, formerly the York movie theater. The York was built by theater mogul Harry Crandall, who also built the Tivoli (14th Street and Park Road) and Lincoln (U Street) movie palaces.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 18.)
 
Location. 38° 55.989′ N, 77° 1.438′ W. Marker is in Pleasant Plains, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Georgia Avenue (U.S. 29) and Park Road, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in front of the Bank of America at 3500 Georgia Avenue NW Washington, DC. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3502 Georgia Avenue, Washington DC 20010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Next Wave (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Former Engine Co 24 of the District of Columbia Fire Department (approx. 0.2 miles away); From Beer Garden to Park View (approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing); Mr. Lincolnís Ride
The Modern Shopper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
3. The Modern Shopper Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Nob Hill (approx. 0.3 miles away); Billy Simpson's House of Seafood and Steaks (approx. 0.3 miles away); "Treat Me Refined" (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pleasant Plains.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Giant Food Shopping Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
4. Giant Food Shopping Center
The grandly named first Giant Food Shopping Center, 1936
Close-up of photo on marker
Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington
Giant Food Cashiers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
5. Giant Food Cashiers
Close-up of photo on marker
Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington
Joseph and Lena Shankman image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
6. Joseph and Lena Shankman
Joseph and Lena Shankman, (seen with an employee inside their Economy Meat Market, 2827 Georgia, in 1922) were members of the District Grocery Stores buying cooperative.
Close-up of photo on marker
Gift of Ruth Compart, Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington
Celia and Nathan Weinreb image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
7. Celia and Nathan Weinreb
Celia and Nathan Weinreb in their 438 V St. store, next to the old Griffith Stadium.
Close-up of photo on marker
Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington
10th Precinct Officers, 1930 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
8. 10th Precinct Officers, 1930
Officers of the 10th Precinct posed for the camera across the street from the station house around 1930
Close-up of photo on marker
Collection of Hiram Brewton
The 10th Precinct Station, 1940s image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
9. The 10th Precinct Station, 1940s
Close-up of photo on marker
The Washington Post
Fred, Nathan and Mildred Deckelbaum image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
10. Fred, Nathan and Mildred Deckelbaum
Fred Deckelbaum and his son Nathan and daughter Mildred pose inside Deckelbaumís Meat Market at 786 Harvard St. (at Sherman), around 1940.
Close-up of photo on reverse of marker
Collection of Nathan Deckelbaum
Map --You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
11. Map --You Are Here
Close-up of map on marker
Giant Liquor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
12. Giant Liquor
The name commemorates the Giant Food store that occupied this spot 77 years ago.
10th Precinct Station image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
13. 10th Precinct Station
This ornate building is now the 4th District substation.
10th Precinct Station image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
14. 10th Precinct Station
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 450 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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