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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Miami in Miami-Dade County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Miami Circle

 
 
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
1. The Miami Circle Marker
Inscription. On this spot of land at the mouth of the Miami River, a historic discovery shed new light on one of Florida's early peoples - the Tequesta.

During the demolition of the Brickell Point apartments in 1998, archaeologists uncovered preshistoric artifacts and a dense deposit of black soil, animal bones and shells. Salvage excavations revealed an unusual feature consisting of holes and basins carved into the shallow Miami oolitic limestone bedrock in a circular pattern 38 feet in diameter.

Circle Gives Meaning
Archaeologists suggest this feature, dubbed the "Miami Circle," represents the foundation of a prehistoric structure made by the Tequesta Indians. Artifacts and carbon dating indicate that people lived here around 2,000 years ago.

En este lugar junto a la boca del río Miami, un descubrimiento histórico arroja luz sobre los tequesta, uno de los primeros habitantes de la Florida.

Durante la demolicion de los apartamentos Brickell Point en 1998, los arqueólogos descubrieron objetos prehistóricos y un denso depósito de tierra negra, huesos de animales, y conchas. Las excavaciones de rescate revelaron una característica inusual. Distribuidos en un circulo de 11.5 metros de diámetro se hallaron huecos y cuencos tallados en el lecho poco profundo de piedra caliza oolítica.

El Significado
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
2. The Miami Circle Marker
del Circulo

Los arqueólogos sugieren que esta característica, apodada "Círculo de Miami", representa los cimientos de una estructura prehistórica construida por los indios tequesta. Los objetos arqueológicos y la datación por radiocarbono indican que este lugar estuvo poblado hace 2,000 años.

(photograph)
Archaeologists excavating the Miami Circle site under the field direction of John Ricisak.
Los arqueológicos excavando el Círculo de Miami bajo la dirección de John Ricisak.

(map, North America: Trade network and distribution hubs. Labels read as follows)
· galena
· copper
· basalt
· chert
· pumice
· Miami Circle
Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, Cuba, Yucatan

(photographs)
Artifacts from Miami Circle excavations, 1998-1999, are indicative of a widespread trade network. Shown clockwise from top:

1. Aerial view of Miami Circle
2. Zoned punctated ceramic sherd
3. Stone celt
4. Three shell plummets of varying sizes
5. Hafted biface blade
6. Galena bead
7. Copper bead

Los objetos hallados durante la excavación del Círculo de Miami, 1998-1999 son un indicio de una extensiva red de comercio. De izquierda a derecha, comenzando desde arriba:

1. Imagen aérea del Círculo de Miami
2. Fragmento de cerámica zonal y acanalada
3. Hacha de piedra
4. Tres plomadas
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
3. The Miami Circle Marker
Excavation of the site
de concha de diferentes tamaños
5. Hoja de hacha bifaz
6. Cuenta de galena
7. Cuenta de cobre


A Trading Hub
Distinctive chipped stone tools from Central Florida, pottery from other parts of the state, polished axes from Georgia, galena (an ore of lead) from central Missouri and copper from elsewhere in the South or Midwest are evidence of a widespread trading network. The Miami Circle also may have served as a hub for distributing some materials, such as pumice.

Un Centro de Comercio
Las distintivas herramientas de piedra tallada originarias del centro de la Florida, las cerámicas de otras regiones del estado, las hachas pulidas de Georgia, la galena (una mena del plomo) del centro de Misuri, y el cobre de otras zonas del Sur o Medio Oeste, son evidencia de una extensiva red de comercio. El Círculo de Miami también puede haber servido como un centro de distribución para algunos materiales como la piedra pómez.

Meaning for Many
The Miami Circle has come to mean many things to many people. Archaeologists gained additional knowledge about the Tequesta while the community developed newfound appreciation of the the area's cultural history.

Diferentes Significados para Diferentes Personas
El Círculo de Miami significa diferentes cosas para diferentes personas. Los arqueólogos obtuvieron nuevos conocimientos
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
4. The Miami Circle Marker
Artifacts
sobre los tequesta mientras que la comunidad adquirió un nuevo aprecio por la historia cultural del área.

Miami Circle is a registered trademark of HistoryMiami.
 
Erected by the Florida Inland Navigation District, the State of Florida Division of Historical Resrouces, and HistoryMiami.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 25° 46.179′ N, 80° 11.338′ W. Marker is in Miami, Florida, in Miami-Dade County. Marker can be reached from Brickell Avenue (U.S. 1/41) north of Southeast 5th Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. The Miami Circle site is operated as a park in Miami's Brickell neighborhood, across from downtown along the south bank of the Miami River. Also known as Brickell Point, the site sits at the mouth of the river, where it empties into Biscayne Bay. The park (not to be confused with Brickell Park, roughly 500 feet to the south) is a short walk east of Fifth Street Station along the Metromover's Brickell loop. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Brickell Avenue, Miami FL 33131, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Saving the Circle (within shouting distance of this marker);
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
5. The Miami Circle Marker
Trade map of natural resources
The Miami Circle at Brickell Point (within shouting distance of this marker); The People of Brickell Point (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Brickell Park (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Brickell Park (about 600 feet away); Great Miami Hurricane of 1926 (approx. 0.4 miles away but has been reported missing); Menendez on Biscayne Bay (approx. half a mile away); Gesu Catholic Church (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Miami.
 
More about this marker. The marker stands along the river walk towards the middle of the park, a few feet away from the Miami Circle formation.

In addition to the photographs and map described above, the marker features an artist's depiction of a male Tequesta with other natives and structures seen in the distance. Along the marker's lower edge appear the logos of its sponsors as well as a small placard noting the availability of a Miami Circle audio tour via telephone at 305-809-8230. For English, select tour stops 20-26, or for Spanish, 30-36.
 
Regarding The Miami Circle.
The Miami Circle Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
6. The Miami Circle Marker
The Miami Circle was listed with the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 (refrence #01001534), and became a National Historic Landmark in 2009.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These markers explain the history of the Miami Circle and Brickell Point.
 
Also see . . .
1. Miami Circle. article on Wikipedia (Submitted on April 27, 2013, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.) 

2. Miami Circle: Audio & Video Tours. The Circle's story presented in video and audio formats by HistoryMiami (Submitted on April 27, 2013, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative AmericansNatural FeaturesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Miami Circle image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
7. The Miami Circle
The Miami Circle image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, March 16, 2013
8. The Miami Circle
The Miami Circle sits on Brickell Point, overlooking the Miami River, Biscayne Bay, and downtown.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 570 times since then and 20 times this year. Last updated on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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