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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bath in Beaufort County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Alexander Stewart

 
 
Alexander Stewart Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 19, 2013
1. Alexander Stewart Marker
glebe house - parsonage, rectory, vicarage - an official residence provided by a church for its parson or vicar or rector
Inscription.
Anglican minister to N.C.,
1753-71. Served parish of
St. Thomas & as chaplain
to Gov. Arthur Dobbs.
Erected first glebe house
on record in the colony.

 
Erected 1968 by Archives and Highway Departments. (Marker Number B-48.)
 
Location. 35° 28.455′ N, 76° 48.797′ W. Marker is in Bath, North Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker is on Craven Street near South Main Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bath NC 27808, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Garzia (a few steps from this marker); St. Thomas Church (within shouting distance of this marker); John F. Tompkins (within shouting distance of this marker); First Post Road (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Edward Teach (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Public Library (approx. 0.2 miles away); Palmer - Marsh House (approx. 0.2 miles away); James Adams Floating Theatre (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bath.
 
Regarding Alexander Stewart.    As chaplain to Royal Gov. Arthur Dobbs, Alexander Stewart (1723-1771) had hoped, on his arrival
Alexander Stewart Marker seen along Craven Street, looking west image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 19, 2013
2. Alexander Stewart Marker seen along Craven Street, looking west
in America in 1753, to serve as an Anglican minister in New Bern. That post being filled, he made his way to Bath and to St. Thomas Church. He continued on the rolls of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. Stewart, born in Lisburn in County Antrim in Ireland, studied at the University of Dublin and served Irish parishes until his move to North Carolina.

   During the course of his ministry, under his direction, the glebe house and attendant outbuildings were completed. The house was the first of its kind in the colony and rested on 300 acres of church-owned land on the outskirts of the town. He initially lived in the house, completed in 1763, but after two years acquired his own plantation on the south side of the Pamlico River across from Bath. From that point the glebe house was only for ceremonial use. James Davis, printer at New Bern, in 1758 published a tract by Stewart entitled The Validity of Infant Baptism. Stewart, in addition to his church work, was also superintendent of schools for Indians and Negroes in North Carolina, being appointed to that task by Dr. Bray’s Associates, an English benevolent society. That group in 1763 established a school in the Lake Mattamuskeet area of Hyde County for the Indians in that vicinity. That work paid fifty pounds per year.

   Stewart was persistently poor. As a result of a hurricane in 1769, he received
St. Thomas Episcopal Church as seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 19, 2013
3. St. Thomas Episcopal Church as seen today
injuries from which he died in 1771. His plantation was damaged severely by the storm and his estate was left in a state of confusion. (North Carolina Office of Archives & History — Department of Cultural Resources)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 598 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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