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Calhoun in Gordon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Cherokee Indian Memorial

 
 
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
1. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Plaque on the front of the monument.
Inscription. (front plaque)
Erected in honor of the Cherokee Nation by the United States Government in 1931 on the site of New Echota, last capital of the Cherokee Indians east of the Mississippi River.

The Cherokee Nation, composed of twenty thousand people, occupied territory in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee. It was recognized by the Supreme Court of the United States as an independent community and was the only group of American Indians to adopt a republican form of government based on a written constitution.

John Ross was elected principal chief. Under the influence of Moravian missionaries, the Cherokees became Christianized, and attained a high degree of civilization.

(rear plaque)
In 1821, Sequoyah, a native Cherokee, invented an alphabet. The first newspaper in the Indian language, "The Cherokee-Phoenix," was published in New Echota by Elias Boudinot, an educated Cherokee, whose wife, formerly Harriet Gold of Cornwall, Connecticut is buried in the tribal cemetery here.

In 1802, the United States agreed to extinguish the Indian title to the lands adjacent to Georgia in return for the cession of Georgia territory now comprising the states of Alabama and Mississippi. A treaty was negotiated December 29, 1835, at New Echota whereby the entire Cherokee territory was ceded
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
2. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Plaque on the rear of the monument.
to the United States for five million dollars and a joint interest in lands in Oklahoma and Kansas occupied by the western Cherokees. The removal was completed in 1838.

 
Erected 1931 by United States Government.
 
Location. 34° 32.449′ N, 84° 54.589′ W. Marker is in Calhoun, Georgia, in Gordon County. Marker can be reached from Georgia Route 225 half a mile east of Newtown Church Road NE, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Calhoun GA 30701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trail of Tears (a few steps from this marker); Historic Site in Journalism (a few steps from this marker); New Echota (within shouting distance of this marker); New Echota Ferry (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); New Echota Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Sequoyah (approx. 1.7 miles away); Calhoun War Memorial (approx. 1.7 miles away); Harlan’s Cross Roads (approx. 3.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Calhoun.
 
More about this marker. The monument is surrounded by four flagpoles, three of which are marked to represent bands of the Cherokee nation. The monument is located just in front of the entrance
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
3. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Flagpole inscription.
to the visitor's center at the New Echota Historic Site.
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
4. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Flagpole inscription.
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
5. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Flagpole inscription.
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
6. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
Monument sits in front of the New Echota Visitor's Center.
Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
7. Cherokee Indian Memorial Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. This page has been viewed 433 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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