Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Calhoun in Gordon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Historic Site in Journalism

 
 
Historic Site in Journalism Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
1. Historic Site in Journalism Marker
Inscription. The Cherokee Nation of Indians established the first Indian-language newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix, on this site in 1828. Edited by Cherokee Elias Boudinot and later by Elijah Hicks, the Cherokee Phoenix was printed bi-lingually in the Sequoyan Syllabary adopted by the Cherokees, and in English, during the period 1828-1834.

Marked this 30th day of October, 1971.
 
Erected 1971 by Sigma Delta Chi, Professional Journalistic Society.
 
Location. 34° 32.447′ N, 84° 54.575′ W. Marker is in Calhoun, Georgia, in Gordon County. Marker can be reached from Georgia Route 225 half a mile from Newtown Church Road NE, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. The plaque is on a wall in an open courtyard at the entrance of the visitorís center at the New Echota Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Calhoun GA 30701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trail of Tears (a few steps from this marker); New Echota (a few steps from this marker); Cherokee Indian Memorial (a few steps from this marker); New Echota Ferry (about 400 feet away, measured
Historic Site in Journalism Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
2. Historic Site in Journalism Marker
The open courtyard at the entrance to the visitor's center at New Echota Historic Site.
in a direct line); New Echota Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); Sequoyah (approx. 1.7 miles away); Calhoun War Memorial (approx. 1.7 miles away); Harlanís Cross Roads (approx. 3.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Calhoun.
 
More about this marker. Other markers, mostly commemorative plaques, also adorn the wall.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicCommunicationsNative Americans
 
Historic Site in Journalism Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, May 29, 2013
3. Historic Site in Journalism Marker
Walk from the parking lot along SR 225 to the visitor's center. The plaque hangs open courtyard just to the left of the railing at the end of the walk.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. This page has been viewed 349 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio.   3. submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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