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Near Pecos in San Miguel County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post
 
Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
1. Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post Marker
 
Inscription.
Built in 1810

 
Erected 1990 by New Mexico State Society - Daughters of the American Colonists.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Santa Fe Trail, and the U.S. Route 66 marker series.
 
Location. 35° 32.351′ N, 105° 40.996′ W. Marker is near Pecos, New Mexico, in San Miguel County. Marker is on New Mexico Route 63 2.7 miles south of New Mexico Route 50, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Left turn lanes are provided from NM 63. Marker is in this post office area: Pecos NM 87552, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pecos Pueblo Mission (approx. 0.8 miles away); St. Anthony's Catholic Church War Memorial (approx. 3 miles away); San Antonio de Padua Catholic Church (approx. 3.1 miles away); Colorado Volunteers at the Battles of Glorieta Pass (approx. 4 miles away); Glorietta Battlefield (approx. 4.9 miles away); Glorieta Pass Battlefield (approx. 4.9 miles away); Caņoncito at Apache Canyon (approx. 8.2 miles away); Hyde Memorial State Park (approx. 15.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pecos.
 
More about this marker. The marker and building are located at the Pecos National Historic Park.
 
Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
2. Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post
The marker is mounted on the front of the building.
 

 
Regarding Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post. There are Santa Fe Trail interpretive materials on the north side of the parking lot.

The trading post was an important stop on the Santa Fe Trail and is on Old Route 66. This portion of the National Historic Park was donated by movie actress Greer Garson. Garson was an important local citizen, assisting with cost-sharing for many local civic improvement projects.
 
Also see . . .
1. Santa Fe National Historic Trail Park Service Page. Links from Interpretive Signs are copied here. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 

2. Pecos National Historic Park Web Page. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
3. Fort Union National Monument. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
4. Information about the Santa Fe Trail. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
5. New Mexico History Musuem. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
 
Santa Fe Trail Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
3. Santa Fe Trail
1822 - 1879
Marked by the
Daughters of the
American Revolution
and the
Territory of New Mexico
 
 
Santa Fe Trail Auto Tour Route Sign Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, July 2, 2013
4. Santa Fe Trail Auto Tour Route Sign


From Trail Sites to the West interpretive sign:

Look for this sign to trace the route of the Santa Fe National Historic Trail.

Please be courteous when viewing a site on private land.

For maps and further information please visit the links on this Historic Marker Data Base page.
 
 
Kosloski's Historic Trading Post and Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Material Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
5. Kosloski's Historic Trading Post and Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Material


Interpretive material from north side of the parking lot.

Pecos and the Santa Fe Trail

The low spot on the horizon before you is Glorieta Pass with Glorieta Mesa to your left and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to your right. For centuries people used this natural corridor for travel and trade. In the nineteenth century it was the route of the Santa Fe Trail, a trade route between Franklin, Missouri and Santa Fe, New Mexico. The trail was actively used from 1821 until the railroad came through in 1880. Present day New Mexico Highway 63 follows its path. The building across the parking lot was once Kozlowski's State Station, one of the final rest stops before the much-anticipated end of the 900-mile journey.

Fresh Fish Dinner - Perhaps the most famous owner of the building to your left was Martin Kozlowski, a Polish immigrant who purchased the 600-acre ranch located along the Santa Fe Trail in 1861. Kozlowski's Stage Station was a highlight for traders along the trail because meals often included freshly caught brown trout from Glorieta Creek. Kozlowski successfully ran the stage station until 1880 when the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad completed its maiden run to Santa Fe, making the Santa Fe Tail obsolete.

Cowboy Entrepreneur - Tex Austin purchased Kozlowski's Ranch in 1924 envisioning a summer recreational ranch with customers coming from the East by train. Austin's customers paid $125 per week to round up cattle and stay in his newly constructed guesthouse. Eventually the ranch was purchased by Texas oilman Colonel E.E> "Buddy" Fogelson and his wife, actress Greer Garson Fogelson.
 
 
Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
6. Kosloski's Historic Stagecoach Stop and Trading Post


Interpretive material from north side of the parking lot.

Trail Sites to the East

Network of Trade - The Santa Fe Trail was an important link in the system of early international trading routes. Goods heading east from Missouri were transported on rivers and canals to reach the ports of New York City and New Orleans. EL Camino Real de la Terra Adentro connected Santa Fe to Chihuahua, Mexico and points farther south.

Heading east, traders had a decision to make at Watrous whether to take the flatter but drier Cimarron Route or head north along the shorter, rugged Mountain Route. If they went north they could rest and resupply at Fort Union before the climb through Raton Pass. At the fort were wheelwrights to fix broken wagon wheels, blacksmiths to mend tools and axles, and a sutler's store stocked with essential supplies and hardware.

1. San Miguel Del Vado - This church was part of the first Hispanic settlement on the trail. Western bound caravans crossed the Pecos River nearby and the crossing point served as a port of entry and campsite for traders headed to Santa Fe.



2. Starvation Peak - Also known as Bernal Hill, this peak was a landmark for Santa Fe Trail traders. Bernal Spring offered water to traders and for a time there was a stage station here.

3. Kearney's Gap - Here, in 1821, Captain Ignacio Gallegos met trader William Becknell's party from Missouri. Mexican independence from Spain two months earlier allowed Governor Facundo Meigares to welcome Becknell and then open the Santa Fe Trail to legal international commerce between Mexico and the United States.

4. Las Vegas, New Mexico - From the top of the flat-roofed adobe structure, between numbers 210-218 on the north side of the plaza Brigadier General Stephen Watts Kearny claimed New Mexico territory for the United States in 1846

5. Watrous Store (Watrous Valley Ranch House) - Samuel Watrous opened a trading store here in 1849 and made his home in this structure. The store catered to Santa Fe Trail traders until the very end of the trail era. The town was originally know as La Junta and was renamed Watrous when the railroad reached the town.

6. Fort Union National Monument - Three forts were constructed o this site, the most recent built in 1863. It protected the western end of the trail and maintained well-supplied warehouses for both military units and private caravans reaching the fort from the east.

 
 
Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Material Photo, Click for full size
By Chris English, June 10, 2013
7. Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Material


Interpretive material from north side of the parking lot.

Trail Sites to the West

Eyewitness - One of the most famous accounts of travel on the trail was written by a sickly young man from Missouri who joined a caravan in 1831, bound for Santa Fe. His health restored, Josiah Gregg ultimately made the trip eight times and became a Santa Fe trader engaging in trade between the United States and Mexico. Written in 1844, his book, Commerce of the Prairies, details the adventures of a trail crossing and life in Santa Fe before the outbreak of the Mexican War.

1. Battle of Glorieta Pass Monuments - These monuments honor those who fell in the Battle of Glorieta Pass in March, 1862. Built by the Texas Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1934 and State Historical Society in 1993, the monuments are located along New Mexico Highway 50.

2. Johnson's Ranch Site (Caņoncito Church) - A trading ranch and stage station on the Santa Fe Trail this ranch played a part in the CIvil War Battle of Glorieta Pass. In MArch 1862 Confederate forces used it as their headquarters. Nothing remains of this ranch today but the area called Caņoncito is located on the site.

3. Wagon Sculpture at Museum Hill - Artist Reynaldo "Sonny" Rivera, in collaboration with landscape architect Richard Borkovetz, created this life sized depiction in bronze of "Journey's End" at Museum Hill in Santa Fe. It is located on Camino Lejo on the original route of the Santa Fe Trail.

4. Amelia White Park - This small park is located at the intersection of the Santa Fe Trail and Camino Corrales. Faint trail ruts can be seen in the park.

5. Santa Fe Plaza - At the plaza, traders unloaded and sold their goods. They celebrated their successful arrival after the 900-mile journey. Traders next traveled the trail back to Missouri with Mexican and New Mexican good to sell in eastern markets.

6. The Palace of the Governors - Built in 1610, this adobe structure served as the seat of government in New Mexico for 300 years. In 1846 General Stephen Watts Kearney raised the U.S. flag over the place and set up temporary residence inside. It now houses the New Mexico History Museum.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on June 10, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. This page has been viewed 410 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 10, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 2, 2013, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of the Sante Fe Trail Interpretive materials on display near the parking lot and a photo of the National Register of Historic Places plaque. • Can you help?
 
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