Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

D.R. Jones’ Division, Longstreet's Command

 
 
D.R. Jones' Division, September 15-16 Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. D.R. Jones' Division, September 15-16 Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command.

Brig. Gen. D.R. Jones, Commanding.
Organization.
Brig. Gen. Robert Toombs' Brigade,
Brig. Gen. Thomas F. Drayton's Brigade,
Brig. Gen. R. B. Garnett's Brigade,
Brig. Gen. James L. Kemper's Brigade,
Col. Joseph Walker's Brigade,
Col. George T. Anderson's Brigade.
September 15-16, 1862.

Jones' Division reached Sharpsburg on the morning of the 15th and took position on Cemetery Hill and the high ground about 350 yards to the west and northwest of this point. A part of Toombs' Brigade, the 50th Georgia of Drayton's Brigade, and a company each of Walker's (Jenkins') Brigade and Hood's Division, all under command of General Toombs, were advanced to contest the passage of the Antietam by the Burnside Bridge and the Fords below. The Washington Artillery (15 guns), Hood's Division Artillery (14 guns) and Captain J.S. Brown's Virginia Battery (4 guns), in all 33 guns, strengthened Jones' Division which formed the extreme right of the Army of Northern Virginia. During the 16th, the Division was subjected to an annoying fire from the long range guns beyond the Antietam.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 368.)
 
Marker series. This
D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command Marker
marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.193′ N, 77° 44.361′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Branch Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located at stop 10, the Final Attack, of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, in a cluster of Confederate tablets. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command (here, next to this marker); Ninth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); 28th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); "It Is A.P. Hill" (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown’s (Wise), Virginia Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Advance Was Made With the Utmost Enthusiasm (within shouting distance of this marker); The Final Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Kanawha Division, Ninth Corps (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for
Confederate Tablet Cluster at Stop 10 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Confederate Tablet Cluster at Stop 10
From left to right are Drayton's Brigade (No. 347), Jones' Division, Sept. 15-16 (No. 368), and the two tablets of Jones' Division, Sept. 17 (No. 369).
a list of markers that are related to this marker. D.R. Jones' Division at Antietam.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. David Rumph Jones. David Rumph Jones (April 5, 1825 – January 15, 1863) was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Robert Toombs. Robert Augustus Toombs (July 2, 1810 – December 15, 1885) was an American and Confederate political leader, Whig Party senator from Georgia, a founding father of the Confederacy, its first Secretary of State, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War of 1861-1865. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Thomas Drayton. Thomas Fenwick Drayton (August 24, 1809 – February 18, 1891) was a plantation owner, politician, railroad president, and military officer from Charleston, South Carolina. He served in the United States Army and then as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Richard B. Garnett. Richard Brooke Garnett (November 21, 1817 – July 3, 1863)
D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command Marker
was a career United States Army officer and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He was killed during Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. James L. Kemper. James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 – April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia. He was the youngest of the brigade commanders, and the only non-professional military officer, in the division that led Pickett's Charge, in which he was wounded and captured but rescued. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Col. Joseph A. Walker (1835-1902) - Find-a-grave. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
8. George T. Anderson. George Thomas Anderson (February 3, 1824 – April 4, 1901) was a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Nicknamed "Tige," Anderson was noted as one of Robert E. Lee's hardest-fighting subordinates. (Submitted on October 9, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command. During the Mexican War, Jones was an officer in the 2nd U.S. Infantry. Here at Antietam, the 2nd U.S. Infantry fought against elements of Jones' Division just south
Major General David Rump Jones (1825-1863) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Major General David Rump Jones (1825-1863)
At Antietam, his division held the right flank of the Army of Northern Virginia when the Union IX Corps attacked. The strain of campaigning aggravated a longstanding heart condition and Jones died in Richmond, Virginia the following January. He is buried there in Hollywood Cemetery.
of the Boonsboro Pike. (Submitted on March 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Brig. General Robert Toombs (1810-1885) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
6. Brig. General Robert Toombs (1810-1885)
He was wounded in the hand at the Battle of Antietam.
Brig. General Thomas F. Drayton (1809-1891) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
7. Brig. General Thomas F. Drayton (1809-1891)
Brig. General Thomas F. Drayton (1809-1891) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
8. Brig. General Thomas F. Drayton (1809-1891)
Brig. General Richard B. Garnett (1817-1863) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
9. Brig. General Richard B. Garnett (1817-1863)
Major General James L. Kemper (1823-1895) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
10. Major General James L. Kemper (1823-1895)
At the Battle of Antietam he was south of the town of Sharpsburg, defending against Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's assault in the afternoon of September 17, 1862. He withdrew his brigade in the face of the Union advance, exposing the Confederate right flank, and the line was saved only by the hasty arrival of A.P. Hill's division from Harpers Ferry.
Col. Joseph A. Walker (1835-1902) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
11. Col. Joseph A. Walker (1835-1902)
Brig. General George T. Anderson (1821-1901) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
12. Brig. General George T. Anderson (1821-1901)
He saw battle during the Peninsula Campaign at Yorktown and commanded a brigade during the Seven Days Battles, Second Bull Run, Turner's Gap, Antietam, and Fredericksburg.
Artillery Concentration on Cemetery Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
13. Artillery Concentration on Cemetery Hill
Looking west from Rodman Avenue at the National Cemetery. In the days before the battle, Confederates massed artillery on the slopes of what is today Cemetery Hill. The batteries covered the Boonsboro Pike and the southern approaches to Sharpsburg.
Drayton's and Jenkins' Brigades Positions image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
14. Drayton's and Jenkins' Brigades Positions
During the morning phases of the battle, much of D.R. Jones' Division, including Drayton's and Jenkins' Brigades held positions on the high ground here. This view is from near the Hawkins Zouaves (9th New York) Monument looking north. The National Cemetery is on the high ground in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 960 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   14. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement