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Oakley in Logan County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Annie Oakley

 
 
Buffalo Bill Cultural Center Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
1. Buffalo Bill Cultural Center Kiosk
Inscription.

At a time when shooting was America's second most popular spectator sport (after horse racing), Annie Oakley (1860-1926) was the superstar. She was born Phoebe Ann Moses in Darke County, Ohio. Her family was extremely poor, and she learned to shoot game to help support them.

Annie met the love of her life, sharpshooter Frank Butler, when at age 15 she beat him in a shooting match.

When Frank made her part of his shooting act, she took the stage name "Annie Oakley." The great Sioux leader Sitting Bull adopted her, Buffalo Bill made her famous, and England's Queen Victoria called her "a clever little girl."

She was the star of the Wild West show for 17 years, from 1885 through 1901.

Annie Oakley had a passion for the outdoors. She was a bicyclist and a superb horsewoman, and she loved hunting with her bird dog, Dave. With a shotgun she showed that women could compete successfully in a man's sport. Not content to be simply a role model, she made a crusade out of teaching women and girls to shoot.

Aim at a high mark, and you will hit it. No, not the first time, nor the second time, and maybe not the third. But keep on aiming, and keep on shooting, for only practice will make you perfect. Finally, you will hit the bull's-eye of success.
- Annie Oakley's motto

Oakley
Photo on Annie Oakley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, 1887
2. Photo on Annie Oakley Marker
[Caption reads] Cast of Buffalo Bill's Wild West, London, 1887 (Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley are highlighted). Cody and his partner, Nate Salsbury, loaded eighteen buffalo, a dozen elk, a small herd of longhorn cattle, and 200 horses onto the S.S. State of Nebraska for the stormy voyage across the Atlantic to England. Courtesy of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming
[Kansas] was not named for Annie Oakley - not exactly. The town had several names as it evolved from a railroad camp to a modern transportation and farming center -- Blaisville, Carlyle, Cleveland, and then Gilmore. Finally, in 1886 entrepreneur D. D. Hoag organized a town company named, he said, in honor of his mother, Eliza Oakley Gardner Hoag. Still, it couldn't hurt that Annie Oakley was already becoming one of the most famous women in America.

Annie's motto is the perfect sentiment for the town and the region. High ideals, hard work, and persistence - not to mention a touch of adventure and a love of the outdoors - have characterized Oakley and the people who call it home.
 
Erected by Wild West Historical Foundation and the Kansas Humanities Council.
 
Location. 39° 7.611′ N, 100° 52.156′ W. Marker is in Oakley, Kansas, in Logan County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 83 and 2nd Street, on the left when traveling north on U.S. 83. Click for map. Marker is in the kiosk adjacent to the Buffalo Bill Cultural Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3083 US Hwy 83, Oakley KS 67748, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Early Exploration across Kansas (here, next to this marker); The Smoky Hill River Valley - Buffalo Country
Photo on Annie Oakley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, 1893
3. Photo on Annie Oakley Marker
[Caption reads] Annie Oakley is shown relaxing in front of her Wild West show tent at the Chicago World's Fair, 1893. Courtesy of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming.
(here, next to this marker); Inhabitants of the Kansas Plains (here, next to this marker); The Monument Rocks (here, next to this marker); Oakley: Birthplace of the Legend (here, next to this marker); The Great Buffalo Hunt (here, next to this marker); Buffalo Bill Cultural Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Logan County Sandstone (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Oakley.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Annie Oakley at American Experience. (Submitted on June 16, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Annie Oakley Bio. (Submitted on June 16, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Annie Oakley Festival. (Submitted on June 16, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Poster on Annie Oakley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1890s
4. Poster on Annie Oakley Marker
[Caption reads] Annie Oakley is shown with a chest full of gold and silver medals for her shooting prowess, but she melted them all down in 1917 to raise money for America's part in World War I.
Photo on Annie Oakley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1890s
5. Photo on Annie Oakley Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 447 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of the full panel at the marker kiosk • Can you help?
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