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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ninth Army Corps

Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis’ Division

 
 
Ferrero's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Ferrero's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Ninth Army Corps
Ferrero's Brigade, Sturgis' Division

Brigadier General Edw. Ferrero, Commanding.
Organization.
51st New York, 51st Pennsylvania,
21st and 35th Massachusetts Infantry.
(September 17, 1862.)

After Ferrero's Brigade carried the stone bridge it formed under cover of the high ground north of it. Nagle's Brigade formed on its left. Willcox's, Scammon's, and Rodman's Division formed in advance of them and moved on Sharpsburg. On the repulse and retirement of the three divisions, Ferrero and Nagle advanced to check Confederate pursuit. The left and center of Ferrero's Brigade halted under cover of crest of the ridge beyond the ravine, the right (35th Massachusetts) continued its advance to Otto's Lane, 270 yards distant, and engaged the Confederates posted on this line and behind the stone walls right and left of it and in the 40 acre Cornfield south. The engagement continued into the night, Ferrero's Brigade sustaining much loss, the principal part of which fell to the 35th Massachusetts, which had 214 officers and men killed and wounded.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 100.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location.
Ninth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Ninth Army Corps Marker
39° 27.077′ N, 77° 44.397′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Branch Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); Durellís Independent Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); 48th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Ninth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Branch's Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Wise (Virginia) Artillery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Longstreet's Command (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, IX Corps. In his official report, Ferrero considered the action here a separate engagement: My troops, when entering this second battle, were nearly out of ammunition, but, firing every
Ferrero's Brigade Tablet next to the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
3. Ferrero's Brigade Tablet next to the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry Monument
round they had in their boxes, they quietly placed themselves on the ground in their position, and remained until other regiments had formed in front to relieve them, when by my orders they retired in good order from the field, and again marched to the banks of the creek.
(Submitted on March 26, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Edward Ferrero. Edward Ferrero (January 18, 1831 – December 11, 1899) was one of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States. He also served as a Union Army general in the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 10, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ninth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Ninth Army Corps Marker
The 11th Ohio Monument is visible in the left background. This monument is accessible via one of the park's hiking trails.
Brig. General Edward Ferrero (1831-1899) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Brig. General Edward Ferrero (1831-1899)
He served at the battles of South Mountain and Antietam, where his brigade was a part of the Union IX Corps and stormed Burnside's Bridge. For his personal bravery at Antietam, the dancer-turned-warrior was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers on September 19, 1862.
Ferrero's Brigade Along Otto Farm Lane image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Ferrero's Brigade Along Otto Farm Lane
In the closing stages of the battle, in an effort to stop the Confederate counter-attack led by A.P. Hill's Division, Ferrero's Brigade along with other units in this sector formed a defensive line along Otto's Lane. This photo looks east of the tablet location. The lane is just in front of a snake rail fence seen on the high ground in the distance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 705 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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