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Bowie in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Belair on the Home Front

Southern Sympathizers

 
 
Belair on the Home Front Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
1. Belair on the Home Front Marker
Inscription. When the Civil War began, Prince George's County was full of Southern sympathizers. To keep Maryland in the Union, President Abraham Lincoln imposed martial law, and as the Prince George's Planters' Advocate on May 8, 1861, noted, "Maryland is thus subjugated without firing a gun." Here at Belair, owner George Cooke Ogle and his family struggled to maintain the plantation. Ogle's nephew, Richard Ogle Hodges, enlisted in the Confederate army, as did many local men.

Camps Union and Casey were built at Bladensburg, and Fort Foote, Fort Washington, and Battery Jameson defended Fort Lincoln. The Planters' Advocate noted on August 28, 1861, that "travellers are stopped at each station [camp] and examined -- the purpose being to intercept 'Contraband' articles."

When the Federals stopped steamboat travel on the Patuxent River in August 1861, the Planters' Advocate complained, "This is a great hardship on our people, who are not only deprived of getting supplies from Baltimore, but are unable to ship their produce, large quantities of which have accumulated at different landings on the river since the boats have stopped."

In 1864, Confederate Gen. Bradley Tyler Johnson raided the county, destroying rail lines at Beltsville, cutting telegraph wires, and bivouacking at the Maryland Agricultural College (now University
Belair on the Home Front Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
2. Belair on the Home Front Marker
of Maryland College Park). Johnson made his headquarters at the Rossborough Inn there.

After the war, George Ogle hoped a new railroad would bring prosperity, but Belair was heavily mortgaged. In 1871, he sold Belair, ending nearly 130 years of family ownership.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 38° 58.008′ N, 76° 44.841′ W. Marker is in Bowie, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Tulip Grove Drive, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. The marker is in front of the Belair Mansion. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12207 Tulip Grove Drive, Bowie MD 20715, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Belair (within shouting distance of this marker); Belair Stable (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Belair Stud Farm (approx. 0.2 miles away); Belair Mansion (approx. 0.4 miles away); William Levitt and Sons, Belair-at-Bowie (approx. 0.8 miles away); Holy Trinity Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); Sacred Heart Chapel - White Marsh (approx. 1.9 miles away); Melford and Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bowie.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the
Belair Mansion in decline, image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
3. Belair Mansion in decline,
from Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly, April 1886
relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
George Cooke Ogle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
4. George Cooke Ogle
owner of Belair
Anna Maria Cooke Ogle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
5. Anna Maria Cooke Ogle
ca. 1860
mistress of Belair
Richard Ogle Hodges image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
6. Richard Ogle Hodges
(1841-1899)
in his Palmetto Guards uniform
Belair Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2013
7. Belair Mansion
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 348 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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