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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor

 
 
Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, July 1, 2013
1. Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor
Inscription. At noon on July 1, 1863, Union troops advanced along Baltimore Street to the fields north of the town. A few hours later they were routed by the Confederates, and fled toward Cemetery Hill.

One half block north of this point, Anna Garlach watched this mob scene from her house, observing, "the crowd was so great I think I could have walked across the street on the heads of the soldiers."

Following the Union retreat to Cemetery Hill this section of Baltimore Street became a deadly "no man's land" between hostile skirmishes.

On November 19, 1863, Baltimore Street again figured prominently in history, when President Abraham Lincoln rode in the procession to dedicated the National Cemetery, where he delivered his immortal Gettysburg Address.

Through the ensuing years, other presidents and distinguished Americans have traveled along Baltimore Street to the National Cemetery to renew Lincoln's dedication to our honored heroes.
 
Erected by Main Street Gettysburg.
 
Location. 39° 49.514′ N, 77° 13.856′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Lefever Street and Baltimore Street, on the right when traveling north
Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, July 1, 2013
2. Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor
on Lefever Street. Click for map. The sign is immediately to the left of Alumni Park entrance on Baltimore Street which is located at the southwest corner of this small park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Lefever Street, Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Evolution of Gettysburg's "Common School" (here, next to this marker); "if anyone showed himself..." (a few steps from this marker); Confederate Stronghold (within shouting distance of this marker); Witness Tree (within shouting distance of this marker); Communications Through Music (within shouting distance of this marker); Unity Through Music (within shouting distance of this marker); History of American Field Music (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Rufus Benjamin Weaver (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker.
The small, yellowish, rectangular sign is contained in a dark black, metal stand stuck into the ground bordering the dedicated pavers inside the park.
 
Regarding Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor.
Concerning the picture: On the morning of November 19, 1863, Lincoln left the David Wills House and
Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor (1963 - 2013) image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, July 1, 2013
3. Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor (1963 - 2013)
traveled via horse down Baltimore Street in Gettysburg (pictured). Giving a short, two minute speech at the dedication of the unfinished Soldiers’ National Cemetery, the President changed how Americans viewed the American Civil War, and helped transform Gettysburg from a battleground into a national icon
 
Also see . . .  Interpretive Plan for the Borough of Gettysburg. (Submitted on July 2, 2013, by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor image. Click for full size.
By Eric Milask, July 1, 2013
4. Baltimore Street - An Historic Corridor
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 479 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Eric Milask of Cherry Hill, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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