Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
La Grange in Lenoir County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

William Dunn Moseley

 
 
William Dunn Moseley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
1. William Dunn Moseley Marker
Inscription.
Member of N.C. Senate,
1829-1836; Speaker, 1833-
1835. First governor of
State of Florida, 1845-
1849. Home was 1 mi. N.

 
Erected 2005 by North Carolina Office of Archives and History. (Marker Number F-42.)
 
Location. 35° 17.838′ N, 77° 47.415′ W. Marker is in La Grange, North Carolina, in Lenoir County. Marker is on South Caswell Street (North Carolina Route 903) near Lake Pines Drive, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: La Grange NC 28551, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. James Y. Joyner (approx. half a mile away); Dobbs County Court House (approx. 3.7 miles away); Dobbs County (approx. 3.7 miles away); a different marker also named Dobbs County Court House (approx. 4.3 miles away); The Battle of Whitehall (approx. 5.7 miles away); Engagement at Whitehall (approx. 5.8 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Whitehall (approx. 5.8 miles away); Wheat Swamp Church (approx. 8 miles away).
 
Regarding William Dunn Moseley.
   Born at the family home, "Moseley Hall," in Lenoir County,
William Dunn Moseley image. Click for full size.
By Oil over photograph, Claribel Jett, ca. 1960. State of Florida
2. William Dunn Moseley
in 1795, William Dunn Moseley was one of many public servants in his family. To begin his career, Moseley graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1821 and pursued a career in law, opening an office in Wilmington. Moseley then became involved in politics and represented Lenoir County in the state senate from 1829 to 1837, serving as speaker for four terms from 1833-1836. While serving as Speaker in 1833, it fell to Moseley to break a tie and his favorable vote allowed passage of the bill of incorporation for the Baptist Literary Institute, now Wake Forest University.

   Political differences lead to a decline in Moseley’s fortunes toward the end of his tenure in the senate and, and after losing a heated election campaign in 1837, he left state politics. Moseley moved to Florida where he previously had purchased a plantation on Lake Miccosukee. He was then elected to the Florida Territorial House of Representatives in 1840 and the Territorial Senate in 1844. The following year he won election to the Governor’s office in the first election since Florida gained statehood, making him the state’s first governor. As governor, Moseley encouraged agriculture in the state, was a strong supporter of states' rights, and favored the establishment of state-funded public schools. Moseley’s term coincided with the start of the Mexican War and skirmishes with the Seminoles.
William Dunn Moseley Marker looking northward along South Caswell Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
3. William Dunn Moseley Marker looking northward along South Caswell Street
The State Capitol was completed and fully occupied in the first year of his administration. After his term of office, Moseley returned to his plantation and later moved to Palatka, where he became a planter and raised citrus fruit. He died on January 4, 1863, and is buried near his Florida home. (North Carolina Office of Archives & History — Department of Cultural Resources)
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
William Dunn Moseley Marker looking south along South Caswell Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 18, 2013
4. William Dunn Moseley Marker looking south along South Caswell Street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 413 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement