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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wooster in Wayne County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice

 
 
Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, June 22, 2013
1. Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker
Inscription.
Barnhart Rice Homestead

The Barnhart Rice house is one of two original farmhouses occupying this 320-acre hilltop farmstead from the early days of the settlement. Started in the spring of 1822, the house was built of hand-cut sandstone ashlar blocks quarried a couple hundred yards northwest of here. With the exception of an early addition added within a few years of the initial construction. The exterior of the house has not undergone any renovations that have had a significant impact on its appearance. The house retains its original fireplaces and woodwork. Originally a springhouse stood near the southwest corner, with the barn to the north and a windmill between the house and barn. The Rice homestead is one of the best preserved examples of German vernacular architecture in Wayne County. The structure traces its origins to the fertile farm lands of southwestern Pennsylvania from which a large percentage of Wayne County's settlers migrated.

Frederick Rice

Frederick Rice was born on September 29, 1753, near Bethlehem, Northampton County, Pennsylvania and moved to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania around 1766. During the American Revolution he served under George Washington at Valley Forge and fought in the Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, in which American forces surprised and
Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, June 22, 2013
2. Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker
captured 1,000 Hessian mercenaries. He served for two more years as a spy working against Native American tribes in western Pennsylvania. After his service he married Catherine Lauffer, and they raised eleven children to adulthood. Rice chose this 320-acre site, transferred to him in a deed signed by President James Monroe on May 21, 1821., because it offered excellent springs. He assigned the west half to son Simon and the east half to son Barnhart in 1822. Ownership remained in the Rice family until acquired for the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station in 1891, renamed the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in 1865.
 
Erected 2005 by Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center/OSU, Descendants of the Rice Family, and the Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 4-85.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 46.962′ N, 81° 55.218′ W. Marker is in Wooster, Ohio, in Wayne County. Marker is on Williams Road just east of Gossard Drive, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. The markers stands alongside a small road on the campus of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Marker is in this post
Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, June 22, 2013
3. Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker
The OARDC Research Services and Operations building can be seen in the background, across Williams Road.
office area: Wooster OH 44691, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. To the Heroes (approx. 0.9 miles away); Calmoutier (approx. 11 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Welcome to OARDC. The web site for the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center of The Ohio State University. (Submitted on July 4, 2013, by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansPoliticsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Abel, June 22, 2013
4. Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. This page has been viewed 479 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Jamie Abel of Westerville, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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