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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Beloved General

 
 
A Beloved General Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 26, 2008
1. A Beloved General Marker
Inscription. "...and I feel pride in the belief that the stand made on Monday, in no small degree, tended to check the temerity of the foe, daring to invade a country like ours, and designing the destruction of our city..."
Brig. Gen. John Stricker writing to Major General Samuel Smith, Report on the Battle of North Point, September 15, 1814

The Battle of Baltimore, the heroic stand against British forces in September 1814, has long ranked among Baltimore's greatest achievements. Among the battle's many heroes was a 55-year-old Revolutionary War veteran of German descent named John Stricker. As commander of a militia brigade, Striker stalled the British infantry advance at the Battle of North Point. When the British naval bombardment failed to take Fort McHenry, - the event that inspired Francis Scott Key to pen "The Star Spangled Banner" - the fate of Baltimore and the nation was secure.

John Stricker (1759-1825) was a native of Maryland's Frederick County. At the time of his death, the 66-year-old was a bank president and a beloved war hero.

Other known burials include Stricker's infant son, George (d. 1793); Joseph J. Nicholson (1831-1864); and, Richard Hopkins (1873-1873). John and Martha Bedford Stricker (1763-1816) had seven other children.

[painting]
From the Gallery of Heroes
Stricker's
Marker and Stricker family vault image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 26, 2008
2. Marker and Stricker family vault
portrait by Rembrandt Peale was one of five commissioned by Baltimore's City Council to commemorate the heroic stand of 1814. The others were Gen. Sam Smith, Lt. Col. George Armistead (commander at Fort McHenry), Commodore Joshua Barney (naval commander and Stricker's brother-in-law), and Major Edward Johnson.

Brigadier General John Stricker by Rembrandt Peale, oil on canvas, 1816
The Maryland Historical Society

[print]
Stalling the Enemy
Members of Stricker's 3rd Brigade prepare to meet 4,700 British troops at North Point. The American line broke under a flank attack, suffering 163 killed and wounded and 50 captured, but retreated in an orderly fashion. More importantly, they managed to slow the British advance. In the hours before the battle, British commander General George Ross had been killed by an American volley, a demoralizing loss even to veteran troops.

Battle of North Point, near Baltimore, aquatint published by Swett & Endicott, ca. 1831
The Maryland Historical Society

[newspaper clipping]
With Military Honors
Stricker's remains were interred with elaborate military honors befitting his long service. He went to war as a teenager in 1776 serving with his father's German regiment at the battles of Princeton, Brandywine, and Monmouth. After time with Maryland's storied
Stricker vault image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 26, 2008
3. Stricker vault
Fifth Regiment, Stricker was appointed Brigadier General of the state militia in 1807. He resigned his commission soon after the Battle of Baltimore and became a merchant.

Order of Procession for John Stricker's Funeral
American & Commercial Daily Advertiser
(Baltimore), June 24, 1825
 
Location. 39° 17.381′ N, 76° 37.391′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from the intersection of West Fayette Street and North Greene Street. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of Westminster Hall and Burying Ground. Marker is at or near this postal address: 519 West Fayette Street, Baltimore MD 21201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 26 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Among Family: Poe’s Original Burial Place (a few steps from this marker); Original Burial Place of Edgar Allan Poe (a few steps from this marker); Dugan-Hollins Family Vault (a few steps from this marker); Believe it or Not (a few steps from this marker); James McHenry (a few steps from this marker); James McHenry, M.D. (a few steps from this marker); Fame, Fortune and Financial Scandal (within shouting distance of this marker); Monumental Lives
Marker and vault as seen from the distance image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 26, 2008
4. Marker and vault as seen from the distance
(within shouting distance of this marker); A Swashbuckling Merchant (within shouting distance of this marker); Bernard von Kapff (within shouting distance of this marker); Local Hero, National Leader (within shouting distance of this marker); Infusing Style and Sophistication: (within shouting distance of this marker); A Mother’s Grief (within shouting distance of this marker); The Carriage Gates of Westminster Burying Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); The Gilmors (within shouting distance of this marker); “…a truly affectionate wife” (within shouting distance of this marker); Final Rest (within shouting distance of this marker); An 18th-Century Burying Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sleep of Young Innocents (within shouting distance of this marker); John McDonogh (within shouting distance of this marker); The McDonoghs of Baltimore (within shouting distance of this marker); Westminster Hall & Burying Ground:
John Stricker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
5. John Stricker
This 1817 portrait of General John Stricker by Rembrandt Peale hangs in the Maryland Historical Society Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

“General John Stricker was a seasoned veteran of the American Revolution when he became the hero of the Battle of North Point on September 12, 1814. Major General Samuel Smith, overall commander of the defense of Baltimore. dispatched Stricker with approximately 3,200 men to block the enemy's overland advance from North Point. The Battle of North Point lasted about two hours until the British outflanked Stricker's left and the Americans retreated in an orderly fashion to the city's main defenses at Hampstead Hill.” — Maryland Historical Society
(within shouting distance of this marker); Westminster Church and Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monument to the Memory of Edgar Allan Poe (within shouting distance of this marker); A La Memorie D’Edgar Allan Poe (within shouting distance of this marker); Poe’s Baltimore (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismWar of 1812War, US Revolutionary
 
Stricker Vault image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
6. Stricker Vault
View to the north image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 26, 2008
7. View to the north
To the left, the Dugan-Hollins vault, in the center, the Calhoun-Buchanan vault, and on the right, the Poe family plot, with the original burial place of Edgar Allan Poe.
Battle of North Point Near Baltimore image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
8. Battle of North Point Near Baltimore
This 1814 painting of the Battle of Northpoint by Thomas Ruckle hangs in the Maryland Historical Society Museum in Baltimore, Maryland.

“Historical legend has it that Thomas Ruckle, Sr. ducked behind a tree during the Battle of North Point and sketched the scene he later rendered in this painting. He gave the painting to Thomas Kell of Baltimore who served as the First Lieutenant in the Independent Light Dragoons during the engagement. Kell had been with Ruckle on the field and later advised him about details of troop locations. Ruckle included General John Stricker, Colonel James Biays, Colonel Joseph Sterrett of the Fifth Regiment, Colonel Kennedy Long, and Colonel Benjamin Fowler in the composition. Long lines of British troops loomed in the distance.
American Officers image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
9. American Officers
Detail of Thomas Ruckle's painting, Battle of North Point Near Baltimore
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 3,023 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3, 4. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   8, 9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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