Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pleasant Plains in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Next Wave

Lift Every Voice

 

óGeorgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail ó

 
The Next Wave Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
1. The Next Wave Marker
Inscription. Caribbean immigrants discovered this stretch of Georgia Avenue in the 1940s, bringing island culture along with jerk chicken, curry, and coco bread. Many, like Eric Williams, who later led Trinidad and Tobago to independence in 1962, came to study or teach at Howard University. Others came seeking better jobs. the 2000 Census showed that Caribbean-born residents formed DC's second-largest immigrant group.

For English-speaking immigrants from the former British West Indies, transition to DC life was relatively easy. They held tightly to their traditions, opening businesses and organizing an annual festival on Georgia Avenue. Behind you on this block Mike and Rita's opened in 1974, specializing in roti, (curried meat and potatoes wrapped in flaky dough). Across the street, at the corner of Lamont, Brown's Bakery opened in 1980, serving patties and spice buns. At that time, there were almost three dozen West Indian establishments along this stretch. Georgia Avenue Day and Carnival parades have featured spectacular costumes, calypso music, and dancing.

On Morton Street, to your right, is where the DC Housing Authority built the Park-Morton public housing complex in the early 1960s. The complex housed African Americans whose homes in Southwest DC were demolished during urban renewal to make way for modern apartments
Carribean Dancer image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
2. Carribean Dancer
Close-up of photo on marker
and offices.
 
Erected by Cutural Heritage DC. (Marker Number 17.)
 
Location. 38° 55.917′ N, 77° 1.425′ W. Marker is in Pleasant Plains, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Georgia Avenue and Morton Street, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue. Click for map. Marker is on the southwest corner of Georgia Avenue and Morton Street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3332 Georgia Avenue, Washington DC 20010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Modern Shopper (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); From Beer Garden to Park View (about 700 feet away but has been reported missing); Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nob Hill (approx. ľ mile away); The Former Engine Co 24 of the District of Columbia Fire Department (approx. 0.3 miles away); "Treat Me Refined" (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mr. Lincolnís Ride (approx. 0.3 miles away); Urban Oasis (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pleasant Plains.
 
Categories. African AmericansScience & Medicine
 
Lamont 5 & 10 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
3. Lamont 5 & 10
Sam Rosen's Lamont 5 and 10 at Georgia and Lamont became Brown's Caribbean Bakery in 1980.
Close-up of photo on marker
Mothership image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
4. Mothership
The building at Georgia and Lamont that was Lamont 5 &10 was Brown's Carribean Bakery until Stephan Boillon opened Mothership, a restaurant and commercial kitchen.
Rita's West Indian Carry-out & Restaurant image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
5. Rita's West Indian Carry-out & Restaurant
Park Morton Appartments image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
6. Park Morton Appartments
"Park Morton, constructed in 1960, is a walkup apartment community servicing families. It has 174 two-bedroom units. It has an on-site playground and is conveniently located near the Georgia Avenue shopping corridor." -- DC Housing Authority.
Discover More ... image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
7. Discover More ...
Dr. Charles R. Drew, who developed a method for storing blood plasma on a mass scale during World War II, was head of surgery at Freedman's Hospital. In the early 1940s he lived with his family one block west of here at 3324 Sherman Avenue, Apartment 1.
Close-up of side-bar on marker
3324 Sherman Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
8. 3324 Sherman Avenue
Close-up of photo on marker
Dr. Drew with Charlene left, and Bebe. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
9. Dr. Drew with Charlene left, and Bebe.
Bebe Drew Price, sponsored the launch of the USNS Charles R. Drew on February 27, 2010.
Close-up of photo on marker
Lenore and Charlene. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 23, 2013
10. Lenore and Charlene.
Charlene Drew Jarvis, educator, scientific researcher and politician became the president of Southeastern University.
Close-up of photo on marker
Planet Chocolate City image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
11. Planet Chocolate City
At Lamont and Georgia.
Planet Chocolate City image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
12. Planet Chocolate City
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 390 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A photo of the marker and surrounding area in context. • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement