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Jeffrey City in Fremont County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Jeffrey City

Biggest Bust of Them All

 
 
Jeffrey City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 28, 2013
1. Jeffrey City Marker
Inscription. Home on the range, a tiny community consisting of a post office, gas station, and a few souls, sat quiet and undisturbed along this lonesome stretch of highway until the 1950's. That all changed when the nation's uranium industry boomed after World War II.
     In the early 1950s, prospectors started combing Wyoming's hills for surefire riches. Then, in 1954 prospector Robert (Bob) Adams discovered uranium. He founded the Lost Creek Oil and Uranium Company, purchased property next to Home on the Range and built a company town, naming it Jeffrey City after Dr. C.W. Jeffrey of Rawlins, his biggest financial backer. Adams renamed his company Western Nuclear, Inc. and later sold to Phelps-Dodge, a mining conglomerate, during the industry's slowdown in the 1960s. With the next uranium boom in the 1970s, Phelps-Dodge added employees and built housing, streets, and parks; Jeffrey City bustled. In 1980, with nearby uranium mines in full swing, over 4,000 people called Jeffrey City home. The school had almost 600 students, and the area's uranium industry employed nearly 1,000 workers. The town's existence revolved around the uranium industry.
     Then came the bust in the early 1980s - and when uranium busted, Jeffrey City faded away. By 1982 only 1,000 people remained. The uranium market dipped lower and nearly
Close-up of Image on Jeffrey City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 28, 2013
2. Close-up of Image on Jeffrey City Marker
Caption: "STOP (Jeffrey City, WY)" painting by Travis Ivey, 2008. CAPA-2009.3.1, Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources, Wyoming State Museum
everyone left town. Homes were wheeled away, and families left in droves. Today the population is less than 100, and Jeffrey City is quiet once again, though the vacant streets still whisper of the thousands who once lived and played here.
 
Erected by Wyoming Historic Mine Trail and Byway System.
 
Location. 42° 29.711′ N, 107° 49.868′ W. Marker is in Jeffrey City, Wyoming, in Fremont County. Marker is at the intersection of Sweetwater Boulevard and Bob Adams Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Sweetwater Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jeffrey City WY 82310, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gold Flakes to Yellowcake Historic Mine Trail (a few steps from this marker); Ice Slough (approx. 9.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Gold Flakes to Yellowcake Historic Mine Trail Brochure. (Submitted on July 25, 2013, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNatural ResourcesSettlements & Settlers
 
Jeffrey City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 28, 2013
3. Jeffrey City Marker
View from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 28, 2013
4. View from Marker
Across Sweetwater Boulevard
Abandoned Street in Jeffrey City image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2010
5. Abandoned Street in Jeffrey City
Abandoned Apartment Buildings in Jeffrey City image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2010
6. Abandoned Apartment Buildings in Jeffrey City
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 440 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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