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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Laurel in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to Dinosaur Park

 
 
Welcome to Dinosaur Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
1. Welcome to Dinosaur Park Marker
Inscription.

A Walk Through Time

As you enter Dinosaur Park you take a walk through time from the present day into Dinosaur times! Modern plants and trees give way to ginkgoes and ferns reminiscent of the early plants and tree that are fossilized here in the clay deposits. Dinosaur Park is a cooperative project between The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission and Jackson-Shaw, developer of the The Brick Yard. This joint project has enabled us to preserve these valuable fossil deposits for scientific studies and public education programs.

Large chunks of siderite (ironstone) recall the days of iron mining when the first dinosaur fossils were found here, and crushed brick paving recalls the role clay deposits played in the local brick making industry.

Fossil Plants at Dinosaur Park

Dinosaur Park is not only important because of its collection of dinosaur bones it is equally important for its collection of fossilized plants. During most of the time that dinosaurs lived flowering plants (angiosperms) did not exist. However, during the Cretaceous Period (144 to 65 million years ago), when the fossil bearing clay layers were forming here at Dinosaur Park, some of the earliest flowering plants appear in the fossil record.

Almost ninety percent of the plants we see today
Welcome to Dinosaur Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
2. Welcome to Dinosaur Park Marker
are flowering plants. the dinosaurs however, saw a completely different view. The plant world of Dinosaur Park consisted of cypress-like trees, medium sized tree ferns, ginkgoes, cycad-like plants, low ferns, mosses, horsetails and clubmosses.

If you were standing here 100 million years ago you would see forest and swamps with a variety of shades of green and some browns. The forest floor would be completely carpeted with plants, and the swampy areas may have had some water lily-like plants. Rivers and streams slowly flowed along meandering paths to the ocean. Though today the plants are different, the environment during dinosaur times was similar to that of southern Louisiana today.
 
Erected by Parks & Recreation, M-N C P P C.
 
Location. 39° 4.249′ N, 76° 52.124′ W. Marker is in Laurel, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Mid Atlantic Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is in Dinosaur Park, 13201 Mid Atlantic Boulevard. Marker is in this post office area: Laurel MD 20708, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dinosaur Alley (here, next to this marker); Dinosaur Park's Industrial Heritage (a few steps from this marker); Dinosaurs in Maryland!
Dinosaur Bones image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
3. Dinosaur Bones
Close-up of photo on marker
(a few steps from this marker); Three Sisters: Close Knit Communities of the Laurel Area. (approx. 0.8 miles away); Abraham Hall: A Historic African American Benevolent Lodge (approx. 0.8 miles away); Iron Production: Maryland's Industrial Past - The Iron Making Process (approx. 0.8 miles away); When the Iron was Hot: African America Ironworkers of Muirkirk (approx. 0.8 miles away); Queen’s Chapel Methodist Church, Established 1868 (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Laurel.
 
Categories. Paleontology
 
Plant Material image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
4. Plant Material
Close-up of photo on marker
Siderite (ironstone) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
5. Siderite (ironstone)
Close-up of photo on marker
Siderite (ironstone) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
6. Siderite (ironstone)
at Dinosaur Park
Ginko Leaf image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
7. Ginko Leaf
Close-up of photo on marker
Ginko Leaves image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
8. Ginko Leaves
at Dinosaur Park
Horsetails and Ferns image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
9. Horsetails and Ferns
at Dinosaur Park
Diggings at Dinosaur Park image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
10. Diggings at Dinosaur Park
Lignized Fossil Plant Material image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 3, 2013
11. Lignized Fossil Plant Material
Collected from the Muirkirk Deposit in 2003, before it became Dinosaur Park.
JacksonShaw -- The Brickyard image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 28, 2013
12. JacksonShaw -- The Brickyard
Real estate sign at Dinosaur Park
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 401 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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