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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Silver Spring in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

‘Most Lonesome Spot’

Tools for the Trades

 

—Silver Heritage Georgia Avenue —

 
‘Most Lonesome Spot’ Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
1. ‘Most Lonesome Spot’ Marker
Inscription. In 1912 John H. and Thomas Hunter opened Hunter Bros., a hardware and implements business, on what John described as "the most lonesome spot between Glenmont and the city of Washington." Housed in a two-story wood frame structure, the hardware business had earlier been owned and operated by James H. Cissel, a co-founder in 1910 of the Silver Spring National Bank.

Located on the Washington and Brookeville Turnpike (Georgia Avenue), Hunter Bros. was positioned to serve Montgomery County farmers transporting their bounty to Washington, D.C. markets. Farmers would place orders with the Hunters on their way to D.C. and pick them up on the return to their farms.

In 1920, John bought out his brother's share of the business, and in 1925 replaced the wood structure with the current brick building at 8126 Georgia Avenue. The Structure's cornerstone, dated 1896, attests to the year John established himself in the hardware business as a sixteen-year-old working for Ornoff & Truxton Co., located at 203 7th Street, NW, in Washington D.C. Hunter likely had this cornerstone fabricated to reflect the number of years that he had been in the hardware business.

Beloved by his employees, Hunter fired but one employee during the thirty-three years that he operated his hardware store. "It hurt me more than it did him," he
‘Most Lonesome Spot’ Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
2. ‘Most Lonesome Spot’ Marker
was quoted as saying in a March 4, 1946 Washington Post article covering a testimonial dinner held in honor of his retirement. John H. Hunter passed away in 1960 at the age of eighty. (The story continues on the other side.)
 
Erected by Silver Spring Historical Society.
 
Location. 38° 59.489′ N, 77° 1.608′ W. Marker is in Silver Spring, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Georgia Avenue (U.S. 29) and Silver Spring Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Georgia Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Silver Spring MD 20910, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Enticing Business (here, next to this marker); The ‘Mayor’ of Silver Spring (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Visions Realized (about 300 feet away); Finding a Niche (about 300 feet away); The Burger King (about 400 feet away); Land, Lumber & Lyrics (about 400 feet away); A Downtown is Born (about 400 feet away); Heat Up, Cool Down (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Silver Spring.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
John H. Hunter & Employees image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
3. John H. Hunter & Employees
John H. Hunter posed with employees, including daughter Gertrude, when the store was sold to Lawrence B. Maloney, Sr. in 1945.M
(L-R) Bowe Atwood*, Leonard Maloney, Thomas Hunter, unknown, Gertrude Hunter McRorie*, unknown, John H. Hunter, unknown, John D. McRorie*, Lawrence Maloney,Jr., Lawrence B. Maloney, Sr. (* indicates employee)
Close-up of photo on marker
Kevin M. Maloney
John H. Hunter & Employees image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
4. John H. Hunter & Employees
The Same Assembled Group gathered inside 8126 Georgia Avenue. Note the pressed tin ceiling. a rare example of commercial tin ceiling survives (in 2012) across the avenue at 8209 Georgia Avenue.
Close-up of photo on marker
Kevin M. Maloney
John H. Hunter Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
5. John H. Hunter Cornerstone
This Cornerstone was originally set into the brick facade of Hunter's 1925 building. When the building underwent remodeling in 1949, Hunter's legacy was preserved and installed in the facade of the new front.
Close-up of photo on marker
Photo by Jerry A. McCoy
Shopping Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
6. Shopping Center
Silver Spring's "Shopping Center" in 1913 provided the neighboring community with all of its needs. The general store of Bernard R. Gannnon, Sr. ison the left and next door is Hunter, Bros. coal and hardware business. Cyrus and Leander McCormick founded McCormick Harvesting Machine Co. in 1847, which became part of International Havester Co., in 1902.
Close-up of photo on marker
Silver Spring Historical Society Collection
Dor-Ne Corset Shoppe image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
7. Dor-Ne Corset Shoppe
8126 Georgia Avenue.
John H. Hunter Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
8. John H. Hunter Cornerstone
The cornerstone is now covered in yellow paint.
Silver Spring Fire House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2007
9. Silver Spring Fire House
The Old Silver Spring firehouse across the street.
Map -- Your are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 11, 2013
10. Map -- Your are Here
This map appears on the "Enticing Business" marker that shares a pole with this marker and continues its story.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 377 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   10. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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