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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson's Command

Branch's Brigade, Hill's Light Division

 
 
Branch's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Branch's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Branch's Brigade, Hill's Light Division,

Brig. Gen. L. O'B. Branch.
Organization.
7th North Carolina Infantry,
18th North Carolina Infantry,
28th North Carolina Infantry,
33d North Carolina Infantry,
37th North Carolina Infantry.
September 17, 1862.

Branch's Brigade formed line at this point about 3 p.m. and supported Archer's Brigade in its advance and encounter at the stone wall about 600 yards distance.

Toward the close of the engagement General Branch was killed and the command fell to Colonel James H. Lane of the 28th North Carolina, who formed the brigade on Archer's left, where it remained until the morning of the 19th when it recrossed the Potomac at Blackford's Ford.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 353.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 26.843′ N, 77° 44.758′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Harpers Ferry Road and Branch Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Harpers Ferry Road. Click for map. Marker is at the intersection of Harpers
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Jackson's Command Marker
Ferry Road and Branch Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Harpers Ferry Road. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hill's Light Division, Jackson's Command (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (here, next to this marker); Munford's Brigade (here, next to this marker); Artillery Battalion, A.P. Hill's Division (here, next to this marker); Pegram’s (Purcell), Virginia Battery (a few steps from this marker); 1st Maryland Artillery (CSA) (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Walker's Division, Longstreet's Command (approx. ¼ mile away but has been reported missing); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (approx. ¼ mile away); Battery A, 5th U.S. Artillery (approx. ¼ mile away); Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 30, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Branch's Brigade, A.P. Hill's Light Division. Col. Lane would write in his official report, We left Harper's Ferry on September 17,
Confederate Tablet Cluster at Harpers Ferry Road and Branch Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Confederate Tablet Cluster at Harpers Ferry Road and Branch Avenue
At the intersection of Harpers Ferry Road and Branch Avenue stand, from left to right, tablets for Field's Brigade (Number 349), Branch's Brigade (Number 353), Hill's Light Division (Number 348), Munford's Brigade (Number 320), and A.P. Hill's Artillery Battalion (Number 372).
and, after a very rapid and fatiguing march, recrossed the Potomac and reached Sharpsburg in time to participate in the fight. The entire brigade was ordered to the right, and, on reaching the field, the Twenty-eighth was detached by General A. P. Hill, in person, and sent on the road to the left leading to Sharpsburg to repel the enemy's skirmishers, who were advancing through a field of corn. The rest of the brigade moved nearly at right angles to our line, and on the enemy's flank.
(Submitted on March 30, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Lawrence O'Bryan Branch. Lawrence O'Bryan Branch (November 28, 1820 – September 17, 1862) was a North Carolina representative in the U.S. Congress and a Confederate brigadier general in the American Civil War, killed at the Battle of Antietam. (Submitted on October 13, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Jackson's Command Marker<br>Second From the Left image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Jackson's Command Marker
Second From the Left
Brig. General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch (1820-1862) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Brig. General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch (1820-1862)
Branch stood talking with fellow brigadier generals Maxcy Gregg, Dorsey Pender, James J. Archer, along with Hill and General Lee when a Federal sharpshooter, seeing the group, fired a shot that hit him in the right cheek and exited behind his left ear, killing him instantly. He fell dead into the arms of a staff officer.
Branch's Brigade Enters the Battle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Branch's Brigade Enters the Battle
Branch's Brigade deployed off the Sawmill Road off to the east of Harpers Ferry Road facing north. The Brigade would pass across what is today Branch Avenue and continue north into the flank of the Federal IX Corps. This photo was taken from the west running section of Branch Avenue looking west toward Harpers Ferry Road. The tablet location is at the top of the hill here. The brigade passed from left to right, with the 37th and 7th North Carolina in the front rank, and the 33rd and 18th in the second rank. The 28th North Carolina was deployed along Harpers Ferry Road screening artillery batteries there. To Branch's right on the ground where this photo was taken, Gregg's Brigade advanced into the Forty Acre Cornfield.
Branch's Brigade Attacks the Federal Flank image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
7. Branch's Brigade Attacks the Federal Flank
From a point along the west running section of Branch Avenue, looking north. Branch's Brigade continued their advance into the Federal flank across the fields here. In the distance on the right can be seen Federal monuments along Branch Avenue, indicating the location of the stone wall. According to the maps provided by the Antietam Battlefield Board, Branch was killed at a point just over the spur seen in the center of the frame.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 695 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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