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Norwood in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring
 
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, August 11, 2013
1. African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker


 
Inscription. Sandy Spring has had large Quaker and African American populations since its founding in the 1720s. Encouraged by their regional and national Religious Society, most Sandy Spring Quakers had freed their slaves by about 1820, creating a significant free black population in the area. African Americans in Sandy Spring owned and worked on farms, and ran schools, churches, and fraternal organizations such as the Sharp Street United Methodist Church and the Odd Fellows Lodge.
In the years before the Civil War, the Underground Railroad was active in Montgomery County, and escapees knew they would be aided by free blacks and Quakers of Sandy Spring as they headed north.

"One way to open your eyes is to ask yourself, "What if I had never seen this before? What if I knew I would never see it again?" — Rachel Carson, The Sense of Wonder (posthumously 1965)
 
Erected by National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, Montgomery Parks.
 
Location. 39° 7.65′ N, 77° 1.51′ W. Marker is in Norwood, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Park Police Drive near Ednor Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located east of Norwood Road (MD 182) at the Park Police Special Operations Section MSP Aviation Division and Woodland Manor site along the exit drive (One Way). Marker is in this post office area: Sandy Spring MD 20860, United States of America.
 
Caleb Bentley Photo, Click for full size
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker, courtesy of the Sandy Spring Museum, `
2. Caleb Bentley
came from Pennsylvania to Sandy Spring, and co-founded the Sandy Spring Store. This portait was made around 1850, when Bentley was in his late 80s.
 

 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Woodlawn (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Holland Red Door Store (approx. 0.2 miles away); History of the Sandy Spring Friends Meeting House (approx. 1.4 miles away); Sandy Spring Friends Meeting Site (approx. 1.4 miles away); Higgins Tavern (approx. 2.5 miles away); Olney House (approx. 2.8 miles away); Smithville Colored School (approx. 3.9 miles away); Brookeville Angel (approx. 4.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Norwood.
 
Remus Hill Photo, Click for full size
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker courtesy of the Sandy Spring Museum, `
3. Remus Hill
was a farm worker, carpenter, and a trustee of the Sharp Street Church. This photo was taken around 1870.
 
 
Friends Meeting House, Sandy Spring , Md. Photo, Click for full size
By African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker, `
4. Friends Meeting House, Sandy Spring , Md.
After meeting for years in a tobacco barn, the Quakers of Sandy Spring built a Meeting House in 1817. This woodcut of the structure, which still stands today, was done in 1833.
 
 
Friends Meeting House as seen today, in nearby Sandy Spring Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, August 11, 2013
5. Friends Meeting House as seen today, in nearby Sandy Spring
 
 
Today the Underground Railroad Experience Trail Photo, Click for full size
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker courtesy of the Sandy Spring Museum, `
6. Today the Underground Railroad Experience Trail
recreates the environment of fields and forests in which runaways would have sought safty on their way north.
 
 
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker along the hiking trail Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, August 11, 2013
7. African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker along the hiking trail
near fields and forests, as mentioned
 
 
African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, August 11, 2013
8. African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring Marker
Park Police and Woodland Manor site along the exit drive (One Way →), at the information kiosk
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 215 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 14, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
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