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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Adams-Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge

 
 
The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 14, 2013
1. The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge Marker
Inscription.

Named in honor of
Edward Kennedy Ellington
1899-1974
Native Son
Composer - Performer - Playwright
International Statesman of Goodwill

 
Location. 38° 55.405′ N, 77° 2.852′ W. Marker is in Adams-Morgan, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Calvert Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. On the Northeast abutment of the Duke Ellington Bridge in Adam's Morgan. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1971 Calvert St, Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walter Pierce Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Million Dollar Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away); Lanier Place (approx. 0.4 miles away); Walsh Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Harry Wardman (approx. half a mile away); McClellan Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Woodley Road Neighbors (approx. half a mile away); The Latino Community (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Adams-Morgan.
 
Also see . . .  Duke Ellington at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on September 18, 2013, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Additional comments.
1. The Calvert Street Bridge
The Calvert Street Bridge carrying Calvert Street over the Rock
The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
2. The ›Duke‹ Ellington Memorial Bridge Marker
Creek gorge was named for Duke Ellington after his death in 1974. The Indiana limestone clad concrete span was built in 1935 to replace a shaky iron trestle bridge built to carry streetcars.
    — Submitted August 20, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
The Duke Ellington Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
3. The Duke Ellington Memorial Bridge
from the Taft Bridge
Air Transportation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
4. Air Transportation
Art Deco Panel by Leon Hermant on the southwest abutment of the bridge.
"a youth soaring over the clouds, represents the daring and earnestness of this new achievement"
Water Transportation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
5. Water Transportation
Art Deco Panel by Leon Hermant on the Northwest abutment of the bridge.
"a female figure, symbol of the smooth motion of ships over oceans and rivers"
Rail Transportation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
6. Rail Transportation
Art Deco Panel by Leon Hermant on the northeast abutment of the bridge
"a male figure, typical of the powerful modern steam engine, flying over the network of tracks covering the country. He holds the Caduceus emblem of trade"
Road Transportation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 17, 2013
7. Road Transportation
Art Deco Panel by Leon Hermant on the southeast abutment of the bridge
"The speedy automobile which replaced the old vehicular traffic over our highways, is represented by a woman leaning over a chassis"
Duke Ellington Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Jack E. Boucher, HAER, 1993
8. Duke Ellington Bridge
Aerial view of the south elevation looking northeast, taken by Jack E. Boucher.
The bridge has security fencing because it was a suicide bridge, used 1940's-70's
Calvert Street Bridge, 1891 image. Click for full size.
MLK Library
9. Calvert Street Bridge, 1891
Historic view of the earlier Calvert Street Bridge, ca. 1891, built for the Rock Creek Railway Company.
HAER/MLK Library
Negative No. 8427
Clifford Berryman Cartoon, 1922 image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
10. Clifford Berryman Cartoon, 1922
This Cartoon from Feb. 19, 1922 spoofs the shakiness of the old trestle bridge in the Jazz age.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 474 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on January 27, 2017.
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