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Near West Wendover in Elko County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Can Anything Survive Here?

 
 
Can Anything Survive Here? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 5, 2013
1. Can Anything Survive Here? Marker
Inscription. Summer temperatures in this high desert can exceed 100 degrees; winter temperatures may fall below zero. Rain and snowfall total a mere six to eight inches per year. Only drought tolerant plants such as Indian ricegrass, shadscale, and greasewood can grow in the valley around you. The jackrabbit and pronghorn antelope are just two of the many animals that have adapted to living in this harsh environment.

This area wasn't always a desert. Limber pine trees covered the Leppy Hills to the east from 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. As the climate became drier, pinyon pine and juniper trees replaced the limber pines at the lower elevations. Pinyon pines are relative newcomers to the surrounding mountains. They didn't arrive until about 7,000 years ago. Today, limber pine and subalpine fir grow only at the higher, cooler and wetter elevations on Pilot Peak and nearby mountain ranges. Animals you might encounter in these forested areas include bighorn sheep, mule deer, elk and mountain lion.

In the fall thousands of raptors (birds of prey) migrate south along this valley. The Great Salt Lake Desert's lack of food, water and lifting air currents form a migration barrier for these birds. Food, water and roosting sites are easy to find in the Toano and Goshute Ranges. Air rising over these mountains to the west provides the lift
Where Did the Lake Go?,<br>Can Anything Survive Here?, and<br>Tough Traveling in the Desert Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 5, 2013
2. Where Did the Lake Go?,
Can Anything Survive Here?, and
Tough Traveling in the Desert Markers
these birds need to soar. Conserving energy by soaring as much as possible during their long journeys is a key to their survival.
 
Location. 40° 50.711′ N, 114° 12.491′ W. Marker is near West Wendover, Nevada, in Elko County. Marker is on Pilot Road 0.2 miles from Interstate 80, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Pilot Rod is accessed from Exit 398 of I-80. Marker is in this post office area: West Wendover NV 89883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tough Traveling in the Desert (here, next to this marker); Where Did the Lake Go? (here, next to this marker); Pilot Peak (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Hastings Cutoff (approx. 10.1 miles away); Wendover Will Reclaims Skyline Once Again (approx. 10.1 miles away); 509th Composite Group – First Atomic Bombardment (approx. 10.9 miles away); Control Tower (approx. 12.1 miles away in Utah); Bomb Squadron Hangar (approx. 12.1 miles away in Utah). Click for a list of all markers in West Wendover.
 
Categories. Environment
 
Pilot Peak image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 5, 2013
3. Pilot Peak
As viewed from marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 218 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   2, 3. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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